Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices toward COVID-19 and Vaccines among Chinese Small-Town Residents: A Cross-sectional Study

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  • 1 Department of General Internal Medicine, Ningbo First Hospital, Ningbo, Zhejiang, China;
  • | 2 Department of Nursing, Ningbo First Hospital, Ningbo, Zhejiang, China;
  • | 3 Department of General Internal Medicine, Ningbo Haishu No. 2 Hospital, Ningbo, Zhejiang, China;
  • | 4 Department of Traditional Medicine, Ningbo First Hospital, Ningbo, Zhejiang, China

China has basically controlled the COVID-19 epidemic as a result of widespread vaccination and other containment strategies, despite localized outbreaks, as of September 2021. This study investigates the knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) of COVID-19 and COVID-19 vaccines among Chinese small-town residents to provide suggestions for public health policy. Residents who were vaccinated against COVID-19 were asked to complete a paper questionnaire on KAP in Xidian, Zhejiang. The knowledge questionnaire consisted of 12 questions regarding COVID-19 and 12 questions regarding COVID-19 vaccines. Attitude and practice evaluation included agreement on the eventual control of COVID-19 and having recently worn a mask outside. Of 405 survey responders, 52.3% were male, 71.4% had middle school education or less, and 59.0% engaged in physical labor as an occupation. The correct answer rates of the COVID-19 section and the vaccine section were 79.2% and 71.7%, respectively. Age groups of 18 to 29 years and > 50 years, occupations of physical labor and unemployment, and primary school education and less were associated with lower knowledge scores. The majority of participants (91.6%) believed that COVID-19 will eventually be controlled, whereas women, students, and patients with chronic held relatively negative attitudes toward epidemic control. Most participants (87.4%) wore masks outside recently. In conclusion, Chinese small-town residents have a medium level of knowledge regarding COVID-19 and vaccines, hold positive attitudes, and have appropriate practices. Health education should be provided to the target populations to enrich their knowledge of COVID-19 and vaccines, and to improve their attitudes toward epidemic control.

Author Notes

Address correspondence to Xue-Qin Chen, Department of Traditional Medicine, Ningbo First Hospital, Ningbo, Zhejiang, China. E-mail: cxq2316@163.com

Financial support: This work was supported by the Zhejiang Medical Health Science and Technology Program (no. 2021KY992), the Ningbo Natural Science Foundation of China (no. 2019Y32), and the Ningbo 2025 Science and Technology Major Project (no. 2021Z018).

Disclosure: This study complied with the Declaration of Helsinki and was approved by the Ethics Committee of Ningbo First Hospital. All participants signed an informed consent form before the survey.

Authors’ addresses: Si-Yi Yu, Ke-Shu Shan, and Lei Xu, Department of General Internal Medicine, Ningbo First Hospital, Ningbo, Zhejiang, China, E-mails: yusysherry@gmail.com, 284182988@qq.com, and xulei22@163.com. Jun-Jun Luo and Ling Ding, Department of Nursing, Ningbo First Hospital, Ningbo, Zhejiang, China, E-mails: 1174693807@qq.com and adtsdl@163.com. Hong-Yao Cui, Department of General Internal Medicine, Ningbo Haishu No. 2 Hospital, Ningbo, Zhejiang, China, E-mail: 760069340@qq.com. Xue-Qin Chen, Department of Traditional Medicine, Ningbo First Hospital, Ningbo, Zhejiang, China, E-mail: cxq2316@163.com.

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