Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices of COVID-19 Vaccination among Adults in Singapore: A Cross-Sectional Study

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  • 1 Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore and National University Health System, Singapore;
  • | 2 Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, National University of Singapore and National University Health System, Singapore

Public health measures promoting compliance of COVID-19 vaccination requires understanding of knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP). This study explored the KAP and risk factors influencing COVID-19 vaccination, including changes in preventive practices before and after vaccination in a high-income country, Singapore. An online cross-sectional study among Singaporeans and permanent residents aged 21 years and older was conducted from July to August 2021. Univariate and multivariable logistic regressions using RStudio version 1.4.1106 was performed to assess associations between demographic factors, KAP, and vaccination status. P values < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. A total of 869 respondents completed the survey. Individuals with higher knowledge (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 2.00, P = 0.024), perceived efficacy (aOR = 1.19, P = 0.004), perceived safety (aOR = 1.20, P = 0.005), and willingness to uptake (aOR = 1.55, P < 0.001) scores were more likely to be vaccinated. There was a significant increase in the use of proper handwashing techniques among the vaccinated group before and after vaccinations. The governmental risk communication approaches have been useful in instilling high levels of vaccine knowledge. High levels of good attitudes about and knowledge of COVID-19 vaccination were associated with a high level of vaccination practices. Good perceived vaccine efficacy and confidence in government were also associated with positive vaccine uptake. This study paves the way for more targeted government measures to be implemented to improve vaccination rates of COVID-19 booster vaccines in a high-income country like Singapore.

Author Notes

Address correspondence to Pang Junxiong, Tahir Foundation Building, National University of Singapore, 12 Science Drive 2 #10-01, Singapore 11754. E-mail: pangv@hotmail.com

These authors contributed equally to this work.

Financial support: Funding for this project was from the National University of Singapore, with a cap of $500.

Authors’ addresses: Joseph Cheng Yuen Juin, Shaun Loong Seh Ern, Clare Elisabeth Ho Si Min, Ng Kai Jing, Miki Ng Min Qi, Ryan Chee Choon Hoe, Tiffany Chin Xuan Ling, Francis Fong Jia Yi, Goh Song Ling Germain, Kumaresh Natarajan S/O Venkatesh, Sim Zi Ying, Zach Chan Yung Shen, Pek Shayne, Liew Xin Wei, Ong Yan Qing Cherie, Benjamin Wu, Luke Yeo Yu Xuan, Tony Ng De Rong, Celeste Ng Zi Hui, Soon Wei Wen, Bryan Shi Yichong, Ruth Wong Si Man, Sean Tan, Ivan Leong, Celeste Chan Li-Lynn, and Tan Jia Wen, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, and National University Health System, Singapore, E-mails: e0433925@u.nus.edu, e0500915@u.nus.edu, e0659266@u.nus.edu, e0659264@u.nus.edu, e0421829@u.nus.edu, e0491489@u.nus.edu, e0421809@u.nus.edu, e0474171@u.nus.edu, e0421815@u.nus.edu, e0659253@u.nus.edu, e0148175@u.nus.edu, zachyschan@u.nus.edu, e0421808@u.nus.edu, e0421766@u.nus.edu, liewxinwei@u.nus.edu, liewxinwei@u.nus.edu, benjamin.wu@u.nus.edu, e0474175@u.nus.edu, tonyndr@u.nus.edu, celeste.ng@u.nus.edu, e0663689@u.nus.edu, e0474145@u.nus.edu, e0477863@u.nus.edu, e0433929@u.nus.edu, leong.ivan@u.nus.edu, celestechan@u.nus.edu, and e0421792@u.nus.edu. Pang Junxiong, Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, National University of Singapore, and National University Health System, Singapore, E-mail: pangv@hotmail.com.

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