Impact of COVID-19 Self-Isolation on Medical Students’ Education and Adherence to Protective Measures

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  • 1 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, The University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan;
  • | 2 Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, The University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan;
  • | 3 School of Medicine, The University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan;
  • | 4 Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, The University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan

This study aims to evaluate the impact of self-isolation on the level of adherence to health protective measures among medical students in Jordan and on their clinical education. Because of being suspected of having or testing positive for COVID-19, 336 students were self-isolated . A questionnaire was sent to study the clinical adherence of students to COVID-19 protective measures after their self-isolation period, the student’s satisfaction about the policy followed during the pandemic, the impact of these measures on their clinical training, and the level of vaccine acceptance among them. The study included 283 participants, with a mean age of 22.5 (±1.50) years; 49.5% males and 50.5% females. We found that students’ adherence to protective measures generally increased after their self-isolation. Gender, age, and having an infection from the hospital were the most important predictors for better adherence to health safety measures. Most students (83%) have registered to take the vaccine. 97.5% of self-isolated students reported that they are aware and satisfied of the School of Medicine instructions and policies. The findings suggest the need to ensure that medical students’ clinical training should not be negatively affected by COVID-19 and COVID-19 self-isolation, as medical students are adherent to COVID-19 precautionary measures and willing to take the vaccine.

Author Notes

Address correspondence to Akram Kilani, School of Medicine, The University of Jordan, Amman 19328, Jordan. E-mail: akramkilani98@gmail.com

Financial support: This research did not receive any funding of any sort in the public, commercial, or not-for-profit sectors.

Authors’ addresses: Fida Thekrallah, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, The University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan, E-mail: fidaaymen@hotmail.com. Saif AlRyalat, Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, The University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan, E-mail: saifryalat@yahoo.com. Ahmad Qarajeh, Akram Kilani, and Dana AlQatawneh, School of Medicine, The University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan, E-mails: ahmad.qarajeh99@gmail.com, akramkilani98@gmail.com, and danaaqatawneh@hotmail.com. Eman Badran, Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, The University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan, E-mail: emanfbadran@gmail.com. Ayman Qatawneh, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, The University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan, E-mail: aymenfida@yahoo.com.

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