COVID-19 Serology Control Panel Using the Dried-Tube Specimen Method

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  • 1 Colorado School of Public Health, Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado;
  • | 2 Children’s Hospital Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado;
  • | 3 Division of Infectious Diseases, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Albany, New York;
  • | 4 The School of Public Health, The University at Albany, Albany, New York;
  • | 5 University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado;
  • | 6 Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio

The dried-tube specimen (DTS) procedure was used to develop the COVID-19 serology control panel (CSCP). The DTS offers the benefit of shipping materials without a cold chain, allowing for greater access without deterioration of material integrity. Samples in the panel were sourced from COVID-19 convalescent persons from March to May 2020. The immunoglobulin subtypes (total Ig, IgM, and IgG) and their respective reactivity to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 nucleocapsid, spike, and receptor-binding domain antigens of the samples were delineated and compared with the WHO International Standard to elucidate the exact binding antibody units of each CSCP sample and ensure the CSCP provides adequate reactivity for different types of serological test platforms. We distribute the CSCP as a kit with five coded tubes to laboratories around the world to be used to compare test kits for external quality assurance, for harmonizing laboratory testing, and for use as training materials for laboratory workers.

Author Notes

Address correspondence to May C. Chu, Colorado School of Public Health, Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO. E-mail: may.chu@cuanschutz.edu

Financial support: This project was funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (investment ID INV-006307 grant).

Disclosure: The acquisition of the plasma material was acquired through a Material Transfer Agreement between the University of Colorado and Vitalant (17.26.14).

Authors’ addresses: William J. Windsor, Molly M. Lamb, and May C. Chu, Colorado School of Public Health, Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, E-mails: wjwindsor58@yahoo.com, molly.lamb@cuanschutz.edu, and may.chu@cuanschutz.edu. Vijaya Knight, Patricia A. Merkel, and Leah Huey, Children’s Hospital Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, E-mails: vijaya.knight@childrenscolorado.org, patricia.merkel@childrenscolorado.org, and leah.huey@childrenscolorado.org. Heidi R. Tucker, Kyle Carson, and Kelly M. Howard, Division of Infectious Diseases, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY, E-mails: heidi.tucker@health.ny.gov, kyle.carson@health.ny.gov, and kelly.howard@health.ny.gov. Jennifer L. Yates and William T. Lee, Division of Infectious Diseases, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY, and The School of Public Health, The University at Albany, Albany, NY, E-mails: jennifer.yates@health.ny.gov and william.lee@health.ny.gov. Mario L. Santiago, Mary K. McCarthy, Thomas E. Morrison, Ross M. Kedl, Ashley Frazer-Abel, Kejun Guo, Gillian Andersen, and Bradley S. Barrett, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, E-mails: mario.santiago@cuanschutz.edu, mary.mccarthy@cuanschutz.edu, thomas.morrison@ucdenver.edu, ross.kedl@cuanschutz.edu, ashley.frazer-abel@cuanschutz.edu, kejun.guo@cuanschutz.edu, gillian.andersen@childrenscolorado.org, and bradley.barrett@cuanschutz.edu. Jessica M. Colón-Franco, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, E-mail: colonj3@ccf.org.

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