Case Report: Rotational Thromboelastometry in Taipan Envenomation

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  • 1 Department of Intensive Care, Cairns Hospital, Cairns, Australia;
  • | 2 Department of Cancer Services, Cairns Hospital, Cairns, Australia;
  • | 3 Emergency Physician and Clinical Toxicologist, Department of Emergency Medicine, Cairns Hospital, Cairns, Australia

Venom-induced consumption coagulopathy (VICC) is one of the most dangerous syndromes caused by snake envenomation and can be caused by several snake species worldwide, including the Australian coastal taipan. Rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) provides real-time point-of-care information on all stages of clot formation; however, it has yet to be formally evaluated in the assessment of VICC. We report three cases of Taipan envenomation causing VICC and the associated ROTEM results. The implications for future use of ROTEM in the assessment, management, and further research of VICC are discussed.

Author Notes

Address correspondence to Catherine L. Tacon, Department of Intensive Care, Cairns Hospital, P.O. Box 902, Cairns 4870, Australia. E-mail: catherine.tacon@health.qld.gov.au

Authors’ addresses: Catherine L. Tacon, Department of Intensive Care, Cairns Hospital, Cairns, Australia, E-mail: catherine.tacon@health.qld.gov.au. Azhar Munas, Department of Cancer Services, Cairns Hospital, Cairns, Australia, E-mail: azhar.munas@health.qld.gov.au. Mark Little, Department of Emergency Medicine, Cairns Hospital, Cairns, Australia, E-mail: mark.little@health.qld.gov.au.

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