Impact of a Measles and Rubella Vaccination Campaign on Seroprevalence in Southern Province, Zambia

View More View Less
  • 1 Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland;
  • 2 Ministry of Health, Government of the Republic of Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia;
  • 3 Macha Research Trust, Choma, Zambia;
  • 4 Tropical Disease Research Center, Ndola, Zambia;
  • 5 University of Zambia School of Medicine, Lusaka, Zambia;
  • 6 University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka, Zambia;
  • 7 Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland

Zambia conducted a measles and rubella (MR) vaccination campaign targeting children 9 months to younger than 15 years of age in 2016. This campaign was the first introduction of a rubella-containing vaccine in Zambia. To evaluate the impact of the campaign, we compared the MR seroprevalence estimates from serosurveys conducted before and after the campaign in Southern Province, Zambia. The measles seroprevalence increased from 77.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 73.2–81.9) to 96.4% (95% CI, 91.7–98.5) among children younger than 15 years. The rubella seroprevalence increased from 51.3% (95% CI, 45.6–57.0) to 98.3% (95% CI, 95.5–99.4). After the campaign, slightly lower seroprevalence remained for young adults 15 to 19 years old, who were not included in the campaign because of their age. These serosurveys highlighted the significant impact of the vaccination campaign and identified immunity gaps for those beyond the targeted vaccination age. Continued monitoring of population immunity can signal the need for future targeted vaccination strategies.

Author Notes

Financial support: The study was funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, who had no role in the data collection, analysis or manuscript.

Authors’ addresses: Andrea C. Carcelen, Simon Mutembo, William J. Moss, and Kyla Hayford, Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, E-mails: acarcel1@jh.edu, smutemb1@jh.edu, wmoss@jhsph.edu, and kylahayford@jhu.edu. Kalumbu H. Matakala, Macha Research Trust, Choma, Zambia, E-mail: hellen.matakala@macharesearch.org. Innocent Chilumba, Tropical Disease Research Center, Ndola, Zambia, E-mail: chilumbai@tdrc.org.zm. Gina Mulundu and Mwaka Monze, University of Zambia School of Medicine & University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka, Zambia, E-mails: ginamulundu0904@gmail.com and mwakamonze@hotmail.com. Francis D. Mwansa, Ministry of Health, Government of the Republic of Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia, E-mail: fmdien@gmail.com.

Address correspondence to Andrea C. Carcelen, Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD. E-mail: acarcel1@jhmi.edu

Save