The Call for Global Health Research Mentorship for Doctorally Prepared Nurses in Low- and Middle-Income Countries

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  • 1 Fogarty International Center, National Institutes of Health, Global REACH, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan;
  • 2 Emory Ethiopia Implementation Research on Obstetric Mortality, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia;
  • 3 Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia;
  • 4 Department of Nursing, College of Health Sciences, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana;
  • 5 Department of Community and Family Medicine, School of Public Health, University of Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia;
  • 6 Department of Nursing, College of Health Sciences, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda;
  • 7 Ghana Health Service, Suntreso Government Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana;
  • 8 Department of Health Behavior and Biological Sciences, PAHO/WHO Collaborating Center, School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan

Limited research about nursing mentorship in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) is holding science back. This article describes the strengths and challenges associated with global health research mentorship for doctorally prepared nurses whose scholarship focuses on LMICs. Using reflexive narrative accounts from current and former nurse mentors and nurse mentees who participated in a NIH-funded global health doctoral research program, emerging themes revealed the perspectives of mentors and mentees, producing a global health mentoring model for nursing research mentorship relevant to LMICs. Identified themes, which applied across roles and primary affiliations, included 1) collaborative mentor–mentee relationships and 2) enthusiasm for global health nursing. Our global health nursing research mentor–mentee interaction systems conceptual model focuses on nursing science mentoring in LMICs incorporating interpersonal, institutional, and cultural factors. We describe successful components of global nurse researcher mentorship and summarize directions for future research in the field. Our model can be used to create more effective mentee-centered mentoring for nurses or health professionals conducting global research. To advance science, we encourage doctorally prepared nurses to support mentee-centered research mentorship experiences that are sensitive to the unique needs of interdisciplinary global health scholarship.

Author Notes

Address correspondence to Julie M. Buser, Fogarty International Center, National Institutes of Health, Global REACH, University of Michigan Medical School, Victor Vaughan Bldg., 2nd Floor, 1111 East Catherine St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109. E-mail: jbuser@umich.edu

Authors’ addresses: Julie M. Buser, Fogarty International Center, National Institutes of Health, Global REACH, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, E-mail: jbuser@umich.edu. John N. Cranmer, Emory Ethiopia Implementation Research on Obstetric Mortality, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, and Emory University, Atlanta, GA, E-mail: john.cranmer@emory.edu. Veronica M. Dzomeku, Department of Nursing, College of Health Sciences, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana, E-mail: vmdzomeku@gmail.com. Alice Ngoma-Hazemba, Department of Community and Family Medicine, School of Public Health, University of Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia, E-mails: alicengomah@gmail.com or ahazemba@unza.zm. Tom Denis Ngabirano, Department of Nursing, College of Health Sciences, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda, E-mail: tomngabirano@gmail.com. Ashura Bakari, Ghana Health Service, Suntreso Government Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana, E-mail: abakari@yahoo.com. Jody R. Lori Department of Health Behavior and Biological Sciences, PAHO/WHO Collaborating Center, School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, E-mail: jrlori@umich.edu.

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