Case Report: Acute Kidney Failure due to Massive Envenomation of a Two-Year-Old Child Caused by Killer Bee Stings

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  • 1 Service de Médecine et Chirurgie Pédiatrique, Cayenne Hospital, Cayenne, French Guiana;
  • 2 Service des urgences, Cayenne Hospital, Cayenne, French Guiana;
  • 3 Centre d’Investigation Clinique Antilles-Guyane (Inserm 1424), Cayenne Hospital, Cayenne, French Guiana;
  • 4 Croix-Rouge Française, Cayenne, French Guiana

A hybrid species of Brazilian bee has proliferated on the South American continent since 1956. We describe a “killer bee” swarm attack on a 2-year-old girl in French Guiana. The patient weighed 10 kg, and approximately hundreds of bees’ stingers were removed, that is, 10 stings/kg. Our patient survived without long-term sequelae. The management of her condition required admission into intensive care for renal failure due to acute tubular necrosis and severe rhabdomyolysis. We emphasize the importance of early medical intervention, clinical surveillance, and biological monitoring at the hospital to prevent a toxic chain reaction that could prove fatal within 72 hours.

Author Notes

Address correspondence to Swann Geoffroy, Service de Médecine et Chirurgie Pédiatrique, Cayenne Hospital, 80 rue Victor Schoelcher, Cayenne 97300, French Guiana. E-mail: swanng785@gmail.com

Authors’ addresses: Swann Geoffroy and Narcisse Elenga, Service de Médecine et Chirurgie Pédiatrique, Cayenne Hospital, Cayenne, French Guiana, E-mails: swanng785@gmail.com and elengafr@yahoo.fr. Alexis Fremery, Service des Urgences, Cayenne Hospital, Cayenne, French Guiana, E-mail: alexis.fremery@gmail.com. Yann Lambert, Centre d’Investigation Clinique Antilles-Guyane (Inserm 1424), Cayenne Hospital, Cayenne, French Guiana, E-mail: y.m.lambert@free.fr. Christian Marty, Croix-Rouge Française, Cayenne, French Guiana, E-mail: victoirechristian.marty@wanadoo.fr.

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