Distribution and Incidence of Blood-Borne Infection among Blood Donors from Regional Transfusion Centers in Burkina Faso: A Comprehensive Study

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  • 1 Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic Rochester, Rochester, Minnesota;
  • 2 Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota;
  • 3 Centre de Recherche Biomoléculaire Pietro Annigoni (CERBA)/LABIOGENE, University of Ouaga I Joseph Ki Zerbo (JKZ), Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso;
  • 4 Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Mayo Clinic Rochester, Rochester, Minnesota;
  • 5 Division of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Scottsdale, Arizona;
  • 6 Centre National de Transfusion sanguine du Burkina Faso (National Center for Blood Transfusion in Burkina Faso), Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso;
  • 7 School of BPTS, Louisiana College of Pharmacy, University of Louisiana at Monroe, Monroe, Louisiana

There is a high prevalence of blood-borne infections in West Africa. This study sought to determine the seroprevalence of blood-borne infections, including hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), HIV, and syphilis, in blood donors in Burkina Faso. Blood donors were recruited from 2009 to 2013 in four major cities in Burkina Faso of urban area (Ouagadougou) and rural area (Bobo Dioulasso, Fada N’Gourma, and Ouahigouya). Serology tests including Hepatitis B surface antigen, anti-HCV, anti-HIV, and rapid plasma reagin test were used for screening and were confirmed with ELISA. Disease prevalence was calculated among first-time donors. Incidence and residual risk were calculated from repeat donors. There were 166,681 donors; 43,084 had ≥ 2 donations. The overall seroprevalence of HBV, HCV, HIV, and syphilis were 13.4%, 6.9%, 2.1%, and 2.4%, respectively. The incidence rates (IRs) of HBV, HCV, HIV, and syphilis infection were 2,786, 2,707, 1,113, and 1,574 per 100,000 person-years. There was lower seroprevalence of HBV and HCV in urban area than in rural area (12.9% versus 14.0%, P < 0.001; and 5.9% versus 8.0%, P < 0.001), and no difference in HIV (2.1% versus 2.1%, P = 0.25). The IRs of new HBV, HCV, HIV, and syphilis were 2.43, 3.06, 1.12, and 1.29 per 100,000 person-years, respectively. The residual risk was one per 268 donations for HBV, one per 181 donations for HCV, and one per 1,480 donations for HIV, respectively. In conclusion, this comprehensive study from four blood donation sites in Burkina Faso showed high HBV and HCV seroprevalence and incidence with high residual risk from blood donation.

Author Notes

Address correspondence to Bolni M. Nagalo, Division of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Mayo Clinic Arizona, 13400 E Shea Blvd., Scottsdale, AZ 85259. E-mail: nagalo.bolni@mayo.edu

Financial support: This work was supported by Mayo Clinic Institutional funding.

Authors’ addresses: Nicha Wongjarupong, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, E-mail: nwongjarupong@gmail.com. Sharad Oli, Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY, E-mail: drsharadoli@gmail.com. Mahamoudou Sanou, Florencia Djigma, Alice Kiba Koumare, Albert T. Yonli, and Jacques Simpore, University of Ouaga I Joseph Ki Zerbo (JKZ), Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, E-mails: mahamoudsanou@hotmail.com, florencia.djigma@gmail.com, alice_kiba@yahoo.fr, yonlitheo@yahoo.fr, and jacques.simpore@yahoo.fr. Mohamed A. Hassan, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburg, PA, E-mail: hassan.mohamed.dr@gmail.com. Kristin Mara, William S. Harmsen, Terry Therneau, and Lewis R. Roberts, Mayo Clinic Rochester, Rochester, MN, E-mails: mara.kristin@mayo.edu, harmsen.william@mayo.edu, therneau@mayo.edu, and roberts.lewis@mayo.edu. Oumar Barro and Bolni M. Nagalo, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, AZ, E-mails: barro.oumar@mayo.edu and nagalo.bolni@mayo.edu. Ghislaine Vodounhessi and Salam Sawadogo, National Center for Blood Transfusion in Burkina Faso, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, E-mails: ghislainetall1270@gmail.com and salemserein@hotmail.com. Jean Christopher Chamcheu, University of Louisiana at Monroe, Monroe, LA, E-mail: chamcheu@ulm.edu.

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