Immunoblot for the Diagnosis of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in French Guiana

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  • 1 Laboratoire Hospitalo-Universitaire de Parasitologie-Mycologie, Centre Hospitalier Andrée Rosemon, Cayenne, French Guiana;
  • 2 Laboratoire Hospitalo-Universitaire de Parasitologie-Mycologie, Institut Hospitalo-Universitaire, Méditerranée Infection, Marseille, French Guiana;
  • 3 Aix Marseille Université, IRD, AP-HM, IHU-Méditerranée Infection, UMR Vecteurs – Infections Tropicales et Méditerranéennes (VITROME), Marseille, France;
  • 4 Department of Dermatology, Andrée Rosemon Hospital, Cayenne, French Guiana;
  • 5 EA3593, Ecosystèmes Amazoniens et Pathologies Tropicales, University of French Guiana, Cayenne, French Guiana;
  • 6 Centre d’Investigation Clinique 1424 Antilles-Guyane, Inserm, Centre Hospitalier de Cayenne, Cayenne, France;
  • 7 Department of Internal Medicine, Andrée Rosemon Hospital, Cayenne, French Guiana

Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is firmly established in South America. We aimed to assess the detection of IgG antibodies against 14 and/or 16 kDa antigens by immunoblot (IB) for CL serological diagnosis in French Guiana, an area where many endemic pathogens could interfere with it. This study was performed retrospectively on sera from 141 patients at the Cayenne tertiary hospital: 30 were patients with confirmed CL, 71 were diagnosed with various other endemic pathogens, 11 were diagnosed with an autoimmune disease, and 29 controls had no history of CL. Antibodies bound to the 14 and/or 16 kDa antigens in 27 of the 30 CL patients’ sera and in 39 of the 111 non-CL patients’ sera (26 from the infectious diseases group, four from the autoimmune diseases group, and nine from the dermatology department). The method tested showed a high sensitivity (90%) and a low specificity (66%), and a diagnosis odds ratio of 17.5 (95% CI [4.6–78.0]). This IB may be helpful to exclude the diagnosis of CL, prompting physicians to look for another diagnosis in the case of a negative IB.

Author Notes

Address correspondence to Estelle Menu. E-mail: estelle.menu@ap-hm.fr

Disclosure: The research was conducted in the absence of any financial or nonfinancial relationship that could be considered as a potential conflict of interest.

Authors’ addresses: Estelle Menu, Laboratoire Hospitalo-Universitaire de Parasitologie-Mycologie, Centre Hospitalier Andrée Rosemon, Cayenne, French Guiana, and Laboratoire Hospitalo-Universitaire de Parasitologie-Mycologie, Institut Hospitalo-Universitaire, Méditerranée Infection, Marseille, French Guiana. E-mail: estelle.menu@ap-hm.fr. Romain Blaizot, Department of Dermatology, Andrée Rosemon Hospital, Cayenne, French Guiana, and EA3593, University of French Guiana, Cayenne, French Guiana, E-mail: blaizot.romain@gmail.com. Charles Mary, Coralie L’Ollivier, and Stéphane Ranque, Laboratoire Hospitalo-Universitaire de Parasitologie-Mycologie, Institut Hospitalo-Universitaire, Méditerranée Infection, Marseille, French Guiana 1and Aix Marseille Université, IRD, AP-HM, IHU-Méditerranée Infection, UMR Vecteurs – Infections Tropicales et Méditerranéennes (VITROME), Marseille, France, E-mails: charlesjoseph.mary@ap-hm.fr, coralie.lollivier@ap-hm.fr, and stephane.ranque@ap-hm.fr. Stéphane Simon, Denis Blanchet, and Magalie Demar, Laboratoire Hospitalo-Universitaire de Parasitologie-Mycologie, Centre Hospitalier Andrée Rosemon, Cayenne, French Guiana, and EA3593, Ecosystèmes Amazoniens et Pathologies Tropicales, University of French Guiana, Cayenne, French Guiana, E-mails: stef240572@gmail.com, denis.blanchet@ch-cayenne.fr, and magalie.demar@ch-cayenne.fr. Antoine Adenis, Department of Internal Medicine, Andrée Rosemon Hospital, Cayenne, French Guiana, E-mail: antoine.adenis@ch-cayenne.fr.

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