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    Image from a computed tomography study of the abdomen of the patient.

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    Hydatid sand containing a protoscolex of Echinococcus granulosus was seen by light microcopy. This figure appears in color at www.ajtmh.org.

  • 1.

    Rogan MT, Hai WY, Richardson R, Zeyhle E, Craig PS, 2006. Hydatid cysts: does every picture tell a story? Trends Parasitol 22: 431438.

  • 2.

    WHO Informal Working Group, 2003. International classification of ultrasound images in cystic echinococcosis for application in clinical and field epidemiological settings. Acta Trop 85: 253261.

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Microscopic Image of the Protoscolex of Echinococcus granulosus on the “Hydatid Sand”

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  • Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital Joan XXIII, Tarragona, Spain; Department of Microbiology, University Hospital Joan XXIII, Tarragona, Spain; Department of Pediatric Surgery, University Hospital Joan XXIII, Tarragona, Spain

An 8-year-old child originally from Morocco spent 1 month in Spain before complaining of abdominal pain for the previous 24 hours. There was no fever, vomiting, or diarrhea. He had lived in a rural area with dogs and sheep. Physical examination detected a mass in upper-right abdominal area. Chest X-ray showed right hemidiaphragmatic elevation. Ultrasonography showed a hypoechoic cyst mass of 12.5 × 10.5 × 8.5 cm without septum or calcifications that was a type CE1 according to the World Health Organization standardized classification.1,2 Computed tomography (Figure 1) and magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the diagnosis of hepatic hydatid cyst. Invasion into the biliary tree bile ducts, portal vein, or hepatic vein was not seen. IgE-specific serology for Echinococcus granulosus was positive (18.3 kUI/L). Serology for Entamoeba histolytica was negative. Aspartate and alanine amino transferase levels were increased (145 U/L and 151 U/L, respectively). Treatment with albendazole was initiated, and cystectomy was performed on the 18th day after admission. Gross examination showed hydatid sand; the protoscolex of E. granulosus was seen by light microscopy (Figure 2). Albendazole was maintained for 3 months and discontinued when ultrasound and serology confirmed resolution. The patient remained asymptomatic on follow-up visits.

Figure 1.
Figure 1.

Image from a computed tomography study of the abdomen of the patient.

Citation: The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 82, 6; 10.4269/ajtmh.2010.09-0743

Figure 2.
Figure 2.

Hydatid sand containing a protoscolex of Echinococcus granulosus was seen by light microcopy. This figure appears in color at www.ajtmh.org.

Citation: The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 82, 6; 10.4269/ajtmh.2010.09-0743

  • 1.

    Rogan MT, Hai WY, Richardson R, Zeyhle E, Craig PS, 2006. Hydatid cysts: does every picture tell a story? Trends Parasitol 22: 431438.

  • 2.

    WHO Informal Working Group, 2003. International classification of ultrasound images in cystic echinococcosis for application in clinical and field epidemiological settings. Acta Trop 85: 253261.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation

Author Notes

*Address correspondence to Antonio Soriano Arandes, Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital Joan XXIII, Tarragona, Spain. E-mail: tsorianoarandes@gmail.com

Authors' addresses: Antonio Soriano Arandes, Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital Joan XXIII, Tarragona, Spain, E-mail: tsorianoarandes@gmail.com. Frederic Gómez Bertomeu, Department of Microbiology, University Hospital Joan XXIII, Tarragona, Spain. Joaquin Maldonado Artero, Department of Pediatric Surgery, University Hospital Joan XXIII, Tarragona, Spain.

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