• View in gallery

    This photograph was taken the day the patient was seen in clinic. At presentation, the lesion was asymptomatic with considerable loss to both sensation and motor function. A presumptive diagnosis of leprosy was made, and she was subsequently referred to the Lusaka Leprosy Clinic for empiric monthly rifampin antibiotic treatment. This figure appears in color at www.ajtmh.org.

  • View in gallery

    This photograph was taken 5 months after antibiotic treatment was initiated. As can be seen, the lesion had significantly receded, and the patient had regained some motor function of the effected areas. She will remain on monthly antibiotics therapy until the infection has been cleared. This figure appears in color at www.ajtmh.org.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Multibacillary Leprosy in Zambia

View More View Less

This individual came to a local Lusaka, Zambia health clinic not complaining of symptoms but to bring her granddaughter for a regularly scheduled appointment for antiretroviral human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) therapy. The child’s grandfather was the one who usually accompanied the child to the clinic, and it had been several years since this individual had left her compound to be seen my a health care worker. The lesion first appeared over her left zygomatic arch 4 years ago and slowly and painfully migrated to across her face, involving much of the nasal cartilage. It then enlarged to what can be seen in Figure 1. At the time this picture was taken she was asymptomatic, and on examination she had lost all sensation and significant motor function of the affected areas. The provisional diagnosis was multibacillary leprosy, which encompasses mid-borderline and borderline lepromatous, and lepromatous leprosy. This diagnosis is associated with symmetric skin lesion, nodules, plaques, thickened dermis, and frequent involvement of the nasal mucosa, as seen in Figure 1. She was subsequently referred to the Leprosy Clinic in Lusaka and empirically treated with monthly doses of rifampin which significantly reduced the lesion and her symptoms as seen in Figure 2. The photograph was taken 5 months after diagnosis and treatment.

Figure 1.
Figure 1.

This photograph was taken the day the patient was seen in clinic. At presentation, the lesion was asymptomatic with considerable loss to both sensation and motor function. A presumptive diagnosis of leprosy was made, and she was subsequently referred to the Lusaka Leprosy Clinic for empiric monthly rifampin antibiotic treatment. This figure appears in color at www.ajtmh.org.

Citation: The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene Am J Trop Med Hyg 81, 2; 10.4269/ajtmh.2009.81.189

Figure 2.
Figure 2.

This photograph was taken 5 months after antibiotic treatment was initiated. As can be seen, the lesion had significantly receded, and the patient had regained some motor function of the effected areas. She will remain on monthly antibiotics therapy until the infection has been cleared. This figure appears in color at www.ajtmh.org.

Citation: The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene Am J Trop Med Hyg 81, 2; 10.4269/ajtmh.2009.81.189

*

Address correspondence to Eiman Zargaran, 633 Bay St., Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5G2G4. E-mail: eiman13@gmail.com

Author’s address: Eiman Zargaran, 633 Bay St., Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5G2G4, Tel: 647-242-8345, E-mail: eiman13@gmail.com.

Save