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Identification of Coronaviruses, Paramyxoviruses, Reoviruses, and Rotaviruses among Bats in Nigeria

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  • 1 Ahmadu Bello University (ABU), Zaria, Nigeria;
  • 2 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia;
  • 3 Akwa Ibom State University, Department of Animal Science, Akwa Ibom State University, Obio Akpa, Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria

ABSTRACT

Bats are often consumed by some ethnic groups in Nigeria despite association of bats with many important emerging viruses. More than 300 bats representing eight species were captured during 2010–2011 in eight locations of northern Nigeria. Available fecal swabs (n = 95) were screened for the presence of arenaviruses, CoVs, paramyxoviruses (PMVs), reoviruses, rhabdoviruses, and influenza viruses using generic reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction assays. Here, we document the detection of CoVs, PMVs, reoviruses, and rotaviruses (RVs) in Nigerian bats. The Nigerian bat CoVs are grouped within other bat SARS-CoV–like viruses identified from Ghana in a sister clade next to the human SARS-CoV clade. The phylogenetic analysis indicated a broad range of RVs present in Nigerian bats, some cluster with human RVs and some represent novel species. Our study adds that continuing global surveillance for viruses in bats to understand their origin, adaptation, and evolution is important to prevent and control future zoonotic disease outbreaks.

    • Supplementary Materials
    • Supplementary Materials

Author Notes

Address correspondence to Suxiang Tong, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Rd., MS G18, Atlanta, GA 30333. E-mail: sot1@cdc.gov

Financial support: The study was supported in part by the Tertiary Education Trust Fund TETF/DESS/AST&D/UNIV/ABU/ZARIA/VOL.2 (G. S. N. K.) and Science and Technology Education Post Basic (STEP-B) Project, Innovators of Tomorrow Grants HME STEP-B/IOT/33/Vol.1/22 (G. S. N. K.).

Disclaimers: The opinions expressed by authors contributing to this journal do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or the institutions with which the authors are affiliated.

Authors’ addresses: Grace S. N. Kia and Jacob K. P. Kwaga, Department of Veterinary Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria, E-mails: glovekia123@gmail.com and jkpkwaga@gmail.com. Ying Tao and Suxiang Tong, Division of Viral Disease, CDC, Atlanta, GA, E-mails: hfe0@cdc.gov and sot1@cdc.gov. Jarlath U. Umoh, Department of Animal Science, Akwa Ibom State University, Mkpat-Enin, Nigeria, E-mail: jarlathumoh@gmail.com.

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