1921
Volume 104, Issue 1
  • ISSN: 0002-9637
  • E-ISSN: 1476-1645

Abstract

Abstract.

Minority communities have borne the brunt of COVID-19 disease in the United States. Nonwhites have contracted most of the SARS-CoV-2 infections; COVID-19 mortality rates for Black Americans are more than twice those for whites. Given this, studying the most effective ways to prevent and treat SARS-CoV-2 in these populations should be a research priority, particularly with respect to vaccine trials. Federal guidelines from the National Institutes of Health and Food and Drug Administration emphasize the need for inclusion of minority groups in these trials, but none of the publicly available SARS-CoV-2 vaccine trial protocols requires representative sampling of minorities. This piece emphasizes the importance of adequate inclusion of minority communities in SARS-CoV-2 vaccine trials, and the implications of this inclusion for SARS-CoV-2 vaccine distribution.

[open-access] This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

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  • Received : 01 Oct 2020
  • Accepted : 03 Nov 2020
  • Published online : 11 Nov 2020
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