1921
image of Review of Cases of Angiostrongyliasis in Hawaii, 2007–2017
  • ISSN: 0002-9637
  • E-ISSN: 1476-1645

Abstract

Angiostrongyliasis, caused by the roundworm, became reportable in the state of Hawaii in 2007. We confirmed 82 reported cases between 2007 and 2017. There was a median of seven cases per year, and the majority (57%) of cases occurred between January and April. Most (83%) cases were found on the island of Hawaii, with GIS analysis identifying hot spots on the east side of the island. However, cases were identified on the other major islands as well, suggesting the risk of exposure is present statewide. Comparisons of cases from 2007 to 2017 with cases from previous assessments found no statistical differences in cerebrospinal fluid results, peripheral blood results, or ages of cases. However, differences in geographic distribution of the cases were statistically significant. Improved testing and increasing awareness of the disease have contributed to our efforts to better understand the general risk factors and modes of transmission present in Hawaii and also helped improve our prevention efforts, although we still do not fully understand the specific causes of cases being concentrated in certain parts of the state over others. Continued outreach efforts, including public forums and publication of preliminary clinical guidelines, aim to inform and improve our public health response and efforts to prevent angiostrongyliasis.

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/content/journals/10.4269/ajtmh.19-0280
2019-07-08
2019-07-22
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http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.4269/ajtmh.19-0280
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  • Received : 12 Apr 2019
  • Accepted : 06 Jun 2019
  • Published online : 08 Jul 2019
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