1921
Volume 101, Issue 3
  • ISSN: 0002-9637
  • E-ISSN: 1476-1645

Abstract

Abstract.

Chagas disease remains a major impediment to sustainable socioeconomic development in Latin America. Transplacental transmission explains the persistence of transmission in urban areas, in non-endemic regions, and in areas with an established interrupted vectorial transmission. One of every five cases of congenital Chagas disease in the world occurs in Colombia and Venezuela. The massive migration of impoverished populations from neighboring Venezuela has worsened the situation creating a humanitarian crisis in Northeastern Colombia, including the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta. The prevalence of Chagas infection among pregnant women in these areas is higher than the national average, and the public health resources are insufficient. This perspective discusses the associated increased morbidity and mortality of congenital Chagas in this region, where stigmatization contributes to the impression among health authorities and the general population that it affects indigenous communities only. The monitoring and control of congenital Chagas disease in the Sierra Nevada of Santa Marta is a public health necessity that demands urgent and effective interventions.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

The graphs shown below represent data from March 2017
/content/journals/10.4269/ajtmh.19-0110
2019-07-01
2020-07-09
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/14761645/101/3/tpmd190110.html?itemId=/content/journals/10.4269/ajtmh.19-0110&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Hotez PJ, Bottazzi ME, Franco-Paredes C, Ault SK, Periago MR, 2008. The neglected tropical diseases of Latin America and the Caribbean: a review of disease burden and distribution and a roadmap for control and elimination. PLoS Negl Trop Dis 2: e300.
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Franco-Paredes C, Von A, Hidron A, Rodríguez-Morales AJ, Tellez I, Barragán M, Jones D, Náquira CG, Mendez J, 2007. Chagas disease: an impediment in achieving the millennium development goals in Latin America. BMC Int Health Hum Rights 7: 7.
    [Google Scholar]
  3. World Health Organization, 2015. Chagas disease in Latin America: an epidemiological update based on 2010 estimates. Wkly Epidemiol Rec 90: 3343.
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2012. Congenital transmission of Chagas disease–Virginia, 2010. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 61: 477479.
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Torrico F, Alonso-Vega C, Suarez E, Rodriguez P, Torrico M-C, Dramaix M, Truyens C, Carlier Y, 2004. Maternal Trypanosoma cruzi infection, pregnancy outcome, morbidity, and mortality of congenitally infected and non-infected newborns in Bolivia. Am J Trop Med Hyg 70: 201209.
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Parra-Henao G, Amioka E, Franco-Paredes C, Colborn KL, Henao-Martínez AF, 2018. Heart failure symptoms and ecological factors as predictors of Chagas disease among indigenous communities in the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, Colombia. J Card Fail 24: 864866.
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Tuite AR, Thomas-Bachli A, Acosta H, Bhatia D, Huber C, Petrasek K, Watts A, Yong JHE, Bogoch II, Khan K, 2018. Infectious disease implications of large-scale migration of Venezuelan nationals. J Trav Med 25. https://doi.org/10.1093/jtm/tay077.
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Gómez Ochoa SA, 2018. Increasing cases of HIV/AIDS in the northern region of the Colombia-Venezuela border: the impact of high scale migration in recent years. Trav Med Infect Dis 25: 1617.
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Dib JC, 2011. Enfermedad de Chagas en las Comunidades Indígenas de la Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta. Bogota, Colombia: Organización Panamericana de la Salud OPS/OMS Colombia.
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Cucunubá ZM et al., 2014. Primer consenso colombiano sobre Chagas congénito y orientación clínica a mujeres en edad fértil con diagnóstico de Chagas. Infectio 18: 5065.
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Colombia SINdSd, 2018. Boletín Epidemiológico Semanal. Semana 32. Available at: https://www.ins.gov.co/buscador-eventos/BoletinEpidemiologico/2018%20Bolet%C3%ADn%20epidemiol%C3%B3gico%20semana%2032.pdf. Accessed January 31, 2019.
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Russomando G, de Tomassone MM, de Guillen I, Acosta N, Vera N, Almiron M, Candia N, Calcena MF, Figueredo A, 1998. Treatment of congenital Chagas’ disease diagnosed and followed up by the polymerase chain reaction. Am J Trop Med Hyg 59: 487491.
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Altcheh J, Biancardi M, Lapeña A, Ballering G, Freilij H, 2005. Congenital Chagas disease: experience in the Hospital de Niños, Ricardo Gutiérrez, Buenos Aires, Argentina [article in Spanish]. Rev Soc Bras Med Trop 38 (Suppl 2): 4145.
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Picado A, Cruz I, Redard-Jacot M, Schijman AG, Torrico F, Sosa-Estani S, Katz Z, Ndung'u JM, 2018. The burden of congenital Chagas disease and implementation of molecular diagnostic tools in Latin America. BMJ Glob Health 3: e001069.
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Henao-Martínez AF, Colborn K, Parra-Henao G, 2017. Overcoming research barriers in Chagas disease-designing effective implementation science. Parasitol Res 116: 3544.
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Weidmann M et al., 2018. Development of mobile laboratory for viral hemorrhagic fever detection in Africa. J Infect Dis 218: 16221630.
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Noazin S et al., 2018. Trypomastigote excretory secretory antigen blot is associated with Trypanosoma cruzi load and detects congenital T. cruzi infection in neonates, using anti–shed acute phase antigen immunoglobulin M. J Infect Dis 219: 609618.
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Alvarez MG, Vigliano C, Lococo B, Bertocchi G, Viotti R, 2017. Prevention of congenital Chagas disease by benznidazole treatment in reproductive-age women. An observational study. Acta Trop 174: 149152.
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Dumonteil E, Herrera C, Buekens P, 2019. A therapeutic preconceptional vaccine against Chagas disease: a novel indication that could reduce congenital transmission and accelerate vaccine development. PLoS Negl Trop Dis 13: e0006985.
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.4269/ajtmh.19-0110
Loading
  • Received : 05 Feb 2019
  • Accepted : 22 May 2019
  • Published online : 01 Jul 2019
This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error