1921
Volume 100, Issue 6
  • ISSN: 0002-9637
  • E-ISSN: 1476-1645

Abstract

Abstract.

Soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections and malaria are parasitic diseases with enormous global health burdens. Research has demonstrated a relationship between each of these parasites and the gut microbiome, suggesting that the gut microbiota may be implicated in governing host susceptibility to diverse pathogens, and perhaps even coinfection by different pathogens, through similar microbiome-influenced pathways. Here, we have derived a first microbiome community profile associated with STH infections in Odisha, India, and tested the hypothesis that the gut microbiome can modulate host susceptibility to multiple parasite infections through the same pathways. This study revealed several bacterial taxa negatively associated with specific STH infections, including and Lachnospiracaea. Our results also suggest that relative abundance of is driven by the STH infection status more so than by the infection status. This study contributes to efforts to understand the effects of the microbiome on host susceptibility to parasitic infections in endemic communities.

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  • Received : 06 Dec 2018
  • Accepted : 19 Feb 2019
  • Published online : 08 Apr 2019
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