1921
Volume 99, Issue 5
  • ISSN: 0002-9637
  • E-ISSN: 1476-1645

Abstract

Abstract.

Zika virus (ZIKV) was first detected in the Americas in Brazil in 2015, with a rapid spread to surrounding countries. In Panama, the outbreak began in November 2015 in an indigenous community located on the Caribbean side of the country. Zika virus is typically associated with a diffuse rash, fever, and conjunctivitis. It can rarely cause neurologic manifestations, most commonly microcephaly and Guillain–Barré syndrome. Encephalitis and acute encephalomyelitis are known complications, but ZIKV-associated cerebellitis has yet to be reported in the literature. Herein, we report a case of cerebellitis in a patient infected with ZIKV. This patient developed severe frontal headache and vertigo on the third day of illness, and dysarthria and ataxia on the fifth day. After 1 week of hospitalization, the patient completely recovered. The laboratory serological diagnosis was complicated because of the detection of antibodies against dengue, suggesting a secondary flavivirus infection.

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  • Received : 26 Mar 2018
  • Accepted : 24 Jul 2018
  • Published online : 24 Sep 2018

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