Report of a Case of Kala-Azar Relapsing after Two Years

Visceral leishmaniasis (Kala-Azar) has been reported with increasing frequency in the United States during the past two years. Search of the literature reveals the appearance of some thirty odd exogenous cases from various sources (1, 2, 3, 4, 5). Doubtless still other cases have been diagnosed and are as yet unpublished. Previous papers have adequately discussed the etiology, epidemiology, pathology, clinical and laboratory findings, and treatment of this disease (1, 2, 6, 7, 8). This report presents a case exhibiting the longest recorded interval between presumptive cure and relapse, two years having passed since “cure” was established and the first appearance of symptoms suggesting recurrence of activity.

REPORT OF CASE R. G., a 32 year old white male, was admitted to the Veterans Administration Hospital, Washington, D. C., on November 2, 1947, complaining of intermittent fever of about four months duration with recent onset of general malaise and chills accompanying the fever.

Author Notes

Clinical Instructor in Medicine, George Washington University School of Medicine; Attending Physician in Internal Medicine, Veterans Administration Hospital, Washington, D. C.

Formerly Resident Physician, Veterans Administration Hospital, Washington, D. C.

Bacteriologist, Arthritis Research Unit, Veterans Administration Hospital, Washington, D. C.

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