Comparative Analysis of Pediatric Patients with Different Involvements of Brucellosis

Melis Deniz Department of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Sanlıurfa Training and Research Hospital, Sanlıurfa, Turkey;

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Hande Şenol Department of Biostatistics, Pamukkale University, Denizli, Turkey;

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Kerim Parlak Department of Microbiology, Sanlıurfa Training and Research Hospital, Sanlıurfa, Turkey;

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Feyza Kabar Department of Pediatric Radiology, Sanlıurfa Training and Research Hospital, Sanlıurfa, Turkey

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Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease that mimics many other diseases, making diagnosis difficult in pediatric patients. If the clinical signs of the disease are not well known and there is a delay in diagnosis and treatment, complicated brucellosis involving different body sites can develop. This study aimed to analyze the demographics, clinical information, laboratory test results, and imaging findings of children with brucellosis. Particular attention was paid to the involvement of organs and potential complications. Pediatric patients diagnosed with brucellosis at the Sanlıurfa Training and Research Hospital in Turkey were retrospectively evaluated. In total, 101 patients diagnosed with brucellosis were included in this study. Bone-joint involvement was observed in 21 (20.7%) patients. High Brucella Coombs gel test (CT) titers (≥1/640) and increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) were significant in the bone-joint brucellosis group (P = 0.022 and P = 0.0205, respectively). Fourteen (13.9%) patients had at least one organomegaly in which Brucella CT titers and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were substantially higher than those in patients without organomegaly (P = 0.02 and P = 0.0049, respectively). Anemia, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia were observed in 36 (35.6%), 10 (9.9%), and 4 (3.9%) patients, respectively. At least one elevation in liver function test (LFT) results was observed in 32 (31.7%) patients. High acute-phase reactants, such as ESR, CRP levels, and Brucella CT titers, may help identify complicated brucellosis. This study highlights that pediatric brucellosis can lead to cytopenia and elevated LFT results and should therefore be considered as a differential diagnosis.

Author Notes

Authors’ addresses: Melis Deniz, Department of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Sanlıurfa Training and Research Hospital, Sanlıurfa, Turkey, E-mail: mlsdnz@gmail.com. Hande Şenol, Department of Biostatistics, Pamukkale University, Denizli, Turkey, E-mail: handesenol@gmail.com. Kerim Parlak, Department of Microbiology, Sanlıurfa Training and Research Hospital, Sanlıurfa, Turkey, E-mail: kerimparlak1@gmail.com. Feyza Kabar, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Sanlıurfa Training and Research Hospital, Sanlıurfa, Turkey, E-mail: feyzakabar@uludag.edu.tr.

Address correspondence to Melis Deniz, Department of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Sanlıurfa Training and Research Hospital, Sanlıurfa Egitim ve Araştırma Hastanesi, Yenice Yolu, No:1, 63250 Eyyubiye/Sanlıurfa, Turkey. E-mail: mlsdnz@gmail.com
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