A Low-Resource Oxygen Blender Prototype for Use in Modified Bubble CPAP Circuits: Results from Design Feasibility Workshops

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  • 1 Division of Critical Care Medicine, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts;
  • | 2 Chenla Children’s Healthcare, Kratie, Krong Kracheh, Cambodia;
  • | 3 Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota;
  • | 4 Department of Pediatrics Global Pediatrics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota;
  • | 5 Department of Pediatrics Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota;
  • | 6 Department of Pediatrics, Hennepin Healthcare, Minneapolis, Minneapolis;
  • | 7 Technological Leadership Institute, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota
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Bubble CPAP is used in low-resource settings to support children with pneumonia. Low-cost modifications of bubble CPAP using 100% oxygen introduces the risk of hyperoxia. Our team developed a low-cost, readily constructible oxygen blender to lower the oxygen concentration. The next step in development was to test its construction among new users and ascertain three outcomes: construction time, outflow oxygen concentration, and an assessment of the user experience. Workshops were conducted in two countries. Instructions were delivered using a live demonstration, a video, and written instructions in the respective native language. Twelve volunteers participated. Average construction times were 24 minutes for the first attempt and 15 minutes for the second. The oxygen concentrations were 53–63% and 41–51% for the 5 and 10 mm entrainment ports, respectively. This novel, low-cost oxygen blender for bubble CPAP can be constructed among new users with reliable performance across devices.

Author Notes

Address correspondence to Andrew G. Wu, Division of Critical Care Medicine, Boston Children’s Hospital, 300 Longwood Ave., Boston, MA 02115. E-mail: andrew.wu@childrens.harvard.edu

Financial support: This research was supported by the National Institutes of Health’s National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, grant number UL1TR002494.

Disclaimer: The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health’s National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences. Additional support was provided by The Pediatric Device Innovation Consortium at the University of Minnesota and the Frank J. and Eleanor A. Maslowski Charitable Trust.

Authors’ addresses: Andrew G. Wu, Division of Critical Care Medicine, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA, E-mail: andrewwu@umn.edu. Sreyleak Luch, Chenla Children’s Healthcare, Kratie, Krong Kracheh, Cambodia, E-mail: sreyleak@gmail.com. Jared R. Floersch and Adam Keester, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, E-mails: floer010@umn.edu and keest001@umn.edu. Tina M. Slusher and Ashley R. Bjorklund, Department of Pediatrics Global Pediatrics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, Department of Pediatrics Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, and Department of Pediatrics, Hennepin Healthcare, Minneapolis, Minneapolis, MN, E-mails: tslusher@umn.edu and bals0064@umn.edu. Gwenyth A. Fischer, Department of Pediatrics Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, E-mail: fisch662@umn.edu. Joseph E. Hale, Technological Leadership Institute, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, E-mail: halex012@umn.edu.

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