Preliminary Report of the Insecticide Susceptibility Status of Aedes Albopictus in Bangladesh

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  • 1 International Centre for Diarrhoeal Diseases Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b), Dhaka, Bangladesh;
  • | 2 QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute (QIMR Berghofer), Brisbane, Queensland, Australia;
  • | 3 Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria, Center for Global Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia;
  • | 4 President’s Malaria Initiative, Bureau for Global Health, Office of Infectious Disease, United Agency for International Development, Washington, District of Columbia

Aedes albopictus is a highly invasive mosquito species and a vector of human arboviral diseases including dengue, chikungunya, and Zika. There are no effective drugs or vaccines for the treatment or prevention of most of these diseases, so the primary option for disease prevention and control is to target mosquitoes, often using insecticides. Despite vector control efforts, cases of arboviral diseases are increasing in Bangladesh and it is important to understand if this escalation is associated with the presence of insecticide resistance in Aedes populations, including Ae. albopictus. The CDC bottle bioassays performed on Ae. albopictus from two districts in Bangladesh detected resistance to permethrin but susceptibility to deltamethrin, malathion, and bendiocarb. The detection of permethrin resistance is worrisome, since arbovirus vector control strategies in Bangladesh currently include the use of permethrin. Routine monitoring of the susceptibility status of key vector populations in Bangladesh will allow a better understanding of resistance trends, enabling the strengthening of control strategies.

Author Notes

Address correspondence to Mohammad Shafiul Alam, International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research Bangladesh (icddr,b), 68 Shaheed Tajuddin Ahmed Sarani, Mohakhali, Dhaka 1212, Bangladesh. E-mail: shafiul@icddrb.org

Funding support: This study was funded by U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, Atlanta, GA), grant number 3U01GH001207-03S1. S. I. was funded by President’s Malaria Initiative.

Disclaimer: The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official position of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Disclosure: This study was approved by the Research Review Committee and Ethical Review Committee of icddr,b, protocol number PR 17050. The purpose and objectives of the study were fully explained to the head of each household and after obtaining verbal consent, ovitraps were installed for mosquito egg collection.

Authors’ addresses: Hasan Mohammad Al-Amin, International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research Bangladesh (icddr,b), Dhaka, Bangladesh, and QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute (QIMR Berghofer), Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, E-mail: hasan.al-amin@qimrberghofer.edu.au. Seth Irish, Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria, Center for Global Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, and President’s Malaria Initiative, Bureau for Global Health, Office of Infectious Disease, United Agency for International Development, Washington, DC, E-mail: xjs7@cdc.gov. Audrey Lenhart, Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria, Center for Global Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, E-mail: ajl8@cdc.gov. Mohammad Shafiul Alam, International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research Bangladesh (icddr,b), Dhaka, Bangladesh, E-mail: shafiul@icddrb.org.

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