Expanding Global Health Engagement through Fogarty Fellowship Programs

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  • 1 Vanderbilt Institute for Global Health, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee;
  • | 2 Department of Biostatistics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee;
  • | 3 Yale School of Public Health, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut;
  • | 4 Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee;
  • | 5 Department of Health Policy, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee

Training the next generation of global health researchers is vital for sustainable research partnerships and global health equity. The Fogarty International Center (National Institutes of Health) supports postdoctoral fellows and professional/graduate students in long-term, hands-on mentored research in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). We surveyed 627 alumni (58% from the United States, 42% from LMICs) from three sequential Fogarty-sponsored global health research training programs (response rate: N = 257, 41%). Publications in the Index Medicus were used to ascertain scholarly output. Most alumni (63%) reported remaining engaged in LMICs and/or worked in academic/research careers (70%). Since completing their Fogarty fellowship, 144 alumni (56%) had received 438 new grants as principal investigator (PI), co-/multi-PI, or site PI. The 257 responding alumni had 5,318 publications during and since their Fogarty fellowships; 2,083 (39%) listed the Fogarty trainee as the first or senior author. These global health training programs highlight the value of LMIC research experience in nurturing the global health research workforce.

Author Notes

Address correspondence to Muktar H. Aliyu, 2525 West End Ave., Suite 725, Nashville, TN 37072. E-mail: muktar.aliyu@vumc.org

Financial support: The programs have been supported by NIH grants R24TW007988, R25TW009337, and D43TW009337. M. H. A. is supported in part by grant D43TW011544.

Disclaimer: The content of this article is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

Authors’ addresses: Allison A. Henry and Donna J. Ingles, Vanderbilt Institute for Global Health, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, E-mails: allison.a.henry@vumc.org and donna.j.ingles@vumc.org. Liping Du, Department of Biostatistics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, E-mail: liping.du@vumc.org. Sten H. Vermund, Yale School of Public Health, Yale University, New Haven, CT, E-mail: sten.vermund@yale.edu. Douglas C. Heimburger, Vanderbilt Institute for Global Health, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, and Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, E-mail: douglas.heimburger@vumc.org. Muktar H. Aliyu, Vanderbilt Institute for Global Health, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, and Department of Health Policy, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, E-mail: muktar.aliyu@vumc.org.

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