Case Report: Granulomatous Amebic Encephalitis due to Acanthamoeba spp. in an Immunocompetent Pediatric Patient

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  • 1 Department of Pediatrics/Infectious Diseases Service, Hospital Universitario “Dr. José Eleuterio González,” Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Monterrey, Mexico;
  • 2 Department of Pediatrics, Hospital Universitario “Dr. José Eleuterio González,” Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo León, Monterrey, Mexico

Granulomatous amebic encephalitis (GAE) caused by Acanthamoeba is a rare infection with central nervous system (CNS) involvement usually with fatal consequences. Currently, information regarding GAE in children is scarce and is limited only to case reports and case series. A 13-year-old immunocompetent male patient with a 6-month history of progressive and intermittent headaches presented to our institution. One week before hospital admission, the patient showed signs of CNS involvement. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed multiple lesions with supra- and infratentorial cerebral abscesses. An empiric treatment with combined antibiotics was given, but the patient died after 20 days of hospital stay. A postmortem diagnosis confirmed GAE. Although it is a rare disease in pediatric patients, GAE should be considered in children with a chronic history of fever, headache, and vomiting with CNS involvement.

Author Notes

Address correspondence to José Iván Castillo Bejarano, Department of Pediatrics/Infectious Diseases Service, Hospital Universitario “Dr. José Eleuterio González,” Francisco I. Madero Avenue, Mitras Centro, ZC 64460 Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Monterrey, Mexico. E-mail: jose.castillobj@uanl.edu.mx

Authors’ addresses: Denisse Vaquera Aparicio, José Iván Castillo Bejarano, and Abiel Mascareñas de los Santos, Department of Pediatrics/Infectious Diseases Service, Hospital Universitario “Dr. José Eleuterio González,” Francisco I. Madero Avenue, Mitras Centro, ZC 64460 Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Monterrey, Mexico, E-mails: dra.denissevaquera@gmail.com, jose.castillobj@uanl.edu.mx, and a_mascarenas@gmail.com. Sergio Ramírez-Cortinas and Manuel de la O Cavazos, Department of Pediatrics, Hospital Universitario “Dr. José Eleuterio González”, Francisco I. Madero Avenue, Mitras Centro, ZC 64460, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo León, Monterrey, Mexico, E-mails: sergiormzc@gmail and manuel.delaocvz@uanl.edu.mx.

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