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Capillaria hepatica (syn. Calodium hepaticum) as a Cause of Asymptomatic Liver Mass

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  • 1 Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan, Israel;
  • 2 Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel;
  • 3 Shaare Zedek Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel;
  • 4 The Hebrew University School of Medicine, Jerusalem, Israel;
  • 5 University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, Vienna, Austria;
  • 6 College of Medicine, Mohammed Bin Rashid University of Medicine and Health Sciences, Dubai, United Arab Emirates

Abstract.

Capillaria hepatica (syn. Calodium hepaticum) is a parasitic nematode of rodents, rarely infecting humans. An asymptomatic Israeli adult male with extensive travel history was diagnosed with a liver mass on routine post-thymectomy follow-up. Imaging and computer tomography (CT) guided biopsy were inconclusive. Surgical excision revealed an eosinophilic granuloma with fragments of a nematode suspected to be C. hepatica. Molecular methods verified the diagnosis, and the patient was treated empirically. This is the first case of hepatic capillariasis described in Israel, and the first to be diagnosed using molecular methods.

Author Notes

Address correspondence to Uri Manor, Sheba Medical Center, Tel HaShomer 5252000, Israel. E-mail: urimanor87@gmail.com

Authors’ addresses: Uri Manor, Merav Rokah, and Daniel Boleslavsky, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan, Israel, and Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel, E-mails: urimanor87@gmail.com, d.daniel.bol@gmail.com, and merv.rok@gmail.com. Victoria Doviner, Amir Dagan, and Menahem Ben-Haim, Shaare Zedek Medical Center, Pathology, Jerusalem, Israel, and The Hebrew University School of Medicine, Jerusalem, Israel, E-mails: victoriad@szmc.org.il, adagan@szmc.org.il, and benhaimm@szmc.org.il. Jolanta Kolodziejek and Pia Weidinger, University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, Vienna, Austria, E-mails: Jolanta.Kolodziejek@vetmeduni.ac.at and pia.weidinger@vetmeduni.ac.at. Norbert Nowotny, University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, Vienna, Austria, and College of Medicine, Mohammed Bin Rashid University of Medicine and Health Sciences, Dubai, United Arab Emirates, E-mail: norbert.nowotny@vetmeduni.ac.at.

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