• 1.

    Aronson N 2017. Diagnosis and treatment of leishmaniasis: clinical practice guidelines by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (ASTMH). Am J Trop Med Hyg 96: 2445.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 2.

    Blum J 2012. Local or systemic treatment for New World cutaneous leishmaniasis? Re-evaluating the evidence for the risk of mucosal leishmaniasis. Int Health 4: 153163.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 3.

    Obonaga R 2014. Treatment failure and miltefosine susceptibility in dermal leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania subgenus Viannia species. Antimicrob Agents Chemother 58: 144152.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 4.

    Soto J, Berman J, 2006. Treatment of New World cutaneous leishmaniasis with miltefosine. Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg 100 (Suppl 1): S34S40.

  • 5.

    Vélez I, López L, Sánchez X, Mestra L, Rojas C, Rodríguez E, 2010. Efficacy of miltefosine for the treatment of American cutaneous leishmaniasis. Am J Trop Med Hyg 83: 351356.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 6.

    Machado PR 2010. Miltefosine in the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania braziliensis in Brazil: a randomized and controlled trial. PLoS Negl Trop Dis 4: e912.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 7.

    Solomon M 2019. Mucosal leishmaniasis in travelers with Leishmania braziliensis complex returning to Israel. Emerg Infect Dis 25: 642648.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Case Report: Miltefosine Failure and Spontaneous Resolution of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis braziliensis

View More View Less
  • 1 University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington;
  • 2 Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Vermont Larner College of Medicine, Burlington, Vermont;
  • 3 Division of allergy and Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington;
  • 4 Division of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington

Abstract.

Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is often caused by Leishmania braziliensis (L. braziliensis) in South America. Because of the risk for mucocutaneous leishmaniasis, L. braziliensis is frequently treated with parenteral or oral medications. Here, we present a case of a young woman with L. braziliensis (CL) that did not respond to miltefosine but eventually experienced spontaneous resolution. This case highlights the potential for treatment failure and the importance of clinical monitoring in the setting of cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by L. braziliensis.

Author Notes

Address correspondence to Anna L. Cogen, 4225 Roosevelt Way NE, 4th Floor, Seattle, WA 98103. E-mail: alcogen@uw.edu

Authors’ addresses: Sheridan Joseph, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA, E-mail: sherjo@uw.edu. Timothy J. Whitman, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Vermont, Larner College of Medicine, Burlington, VT, E-mail: timothy.whitman@uvmheath.org. Frederick Buckner, Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, E-mail: fbuckner@medicine.washington.edu. Anna L. Cogen, Division of Dermatology, Department of medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, E-mail: alcogen@uw.edu.

Save