Development of rSs-NIE-1 and rSs-IR Recombinant Antigen-Based Immunoblot for Detection of Antibody to Strongyloides stercoralis

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  • 1 Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, Brazil;
  • 2 Kennesaw State University, Kennesaw, Georgia;
  • 3 Synergy, Co., Atlanta, Georgia;
  • 4 Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia

Strongyloides stercoralis is a soil-transmitted nematode that can cause life-threatening conditions in immunocompromised persons. In the United States, strongyloidiasis should be considered mainly in immigrants, refugees, or travelers. The confirmatory laboratory diagnosis is usually performed by detecting larvae from the stool, duodenal material, and sputum. In persons who are immunocompromised with severe strongyloidiasis, adult worms and eggs can be detected from duodenal material. For serological diagnosis, most assays use crude antigens to detect anti-S. stercoralis IgG. Recently, recombinant proteins such as rSs-NIE-1 and rSs-IR have been used to detect IgG antibodies. We used rSs-NIE-1 and rSs-IR recombinant antigens to develop a biplex Western blot assay to detect the IgG4 antibody in individuals with strongyloidiasis. The sensitivities of rSs-NIE-1 and rSs-IR were 97.4% and 90.8%, respectively, whereas the specificities were 97.6% and 98%, respectively. In conclusion, the biplex rSs-NIE-1 and rSs-IR immunoblot performs well in detecting IgG4 antibody in S. stercoralis-infected persons.

Author Notes

Address correspondence to Sukwan Handali, CDC Roybal Campus, Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria, 1600 Clifton Rd., NE, Atlanta, GA 30329. E-mail: ahi0@cdc.govThese authors contributed equally to this work.

Authors’ addresses: Joelma Nascimento de Souza and Neci Matos Soares, Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, Brazil, E-mails: joelmandesouza@gmail.com and necisoares@gmail.com. I’Isha Langford, Kennesaw State University, Kennesaw, GA, E-mail: langfordsha@gmail.com. Yong Wang, Synergy, Co., Atlanta, GA, and Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, E-mail: oeq6@cdc.gov. Sukwan Handali, Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, E-mail: ahi0@cdc.gov.

Disclaimer: The use of trade names is for identification only and does not imply endorsement by the Public Health Service or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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