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Determinants and Coverage of Vaccination in Children in Western Kenya from a 2003 Cross-Sectional Survey

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  • University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan; Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Liverpool, United Kingdom; Malaria Branch, Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria, Center for Global Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia; Kenya Medical Research Institute/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Research and Public Health Collaboration, Centre for Global Health Research, Kisumu, Kenya

This study assesses full and timely vaccination coverage and factors associated with full vaccination in children ages 12–23 months in Gem, Nyanza Province, Kenya in 2003. A simple random sample of 1,769 households was selected, and guardians were invited to bring children under 5 years of age to participate in a survey. Full vaccination coverage was 31.1% among 244 children. Only 2.2% received all vaccinations in the target month for each vaccination. In multivariate logistic regression, children of mothers of higher parity (odds ratio [OR] = 0.27, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 0.13–0.65, P ≤ 0.01), children of mothers with lower maternal education (OR = 0.35, 95% CI = 0.13–0.97, P ≤ 0.05), or children in households with the spouse absent versus present (OR = 0.40, 95% CI = 0.17–0.91, P ≤ 0.05) were less likely to be fully vaccinated. These data serve as a baseline from which changes in vaccination coverage will be measured as interventions to improve vaccination timeliness are introduced.

Author Notes

* Address correspondence to Lisa M. Calhoun, Carolina Population Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27510. E-mail: lisa.m.calhoun@gmail.com

Financial support: The University of Michigan School of Public Health Global Health Interdepartmental Concentration and University of Michigan Global Health and Training Initiative provided financial support to carry out this work.

Authors' addresses: Lisa M. Calhoun, Carolina Population Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, E-mail: lisa.m.calhoun@gmail.com. Anna M. van Eijk, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Liverpool, UK, E-mail: amvaneijk@yahoo.com. Kim A. Lindblade and Mary J. Hamel, Malaria Branch, Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria, Center for Global Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, E-mails: kil2@cdc.gov and mlh8@cdc.gov. Frank O. Odhiambo, Kenya Medical Research Institute/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Research and Public Health Collaboration, Centre for Global Health Research, Kisumu, Kenya, E-mail: odhiambo@ke.cdc.govkemricdc.org. Mark L. Wilson, Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, E-mail: wilsonml@umich.edu. Elizabeth Winterbauer, Vermont Program for Quality in Health Care, Inc., Montpelier, VT, E-mail: liz.winterbauer@gmail.com. Laurence Slutsker, Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria, Center for Global Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, E-mail: lms5@cdc.gov.

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