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Outbreak of Human Trichinellosis in Northern California Caused by Trichinella murrelli

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  • LifeSource Biomedical, LLC, Moffett Field, California; Public Health Branch, Humboldt County Department of Health, Eureka, California; Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria, Center for Global Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia; Center for Infectious Diseases, California Department of Public Health, Sacramento, California

In October of 2008, an outbreak of trichinellosis occurred in northern California that sickened 30 of 38 attendees of an event at which meat from a black bear was served. Morphologic and molecular testing of muscle from the leftover portion of bear meat revealed that the bear was infected with Trichinella murrelli, a sylvatic species of Trichinella found in temperate North America. Clinical records revealed a high attack rate for this outbreak: 78% for persons consuming any bear meat and 100% for persons consuming raw or undercooked bear meat. To our knowledge, this report is the first published report of a human trichinellosis outbreak in the United States attributed to T. murrelli, and it is the second such outbreak reported worldwide.

Author Notes

*Address correspondence to Rebecca L. Hall, 1600 Clifton Road, NE, Mailstop A-06, Atlanta, GA 30333. E-mail: bqu5@cdc.gov

Authors' addresses: Rebecca L. Hall, Susan P. Montgomery, Patricia Wilkins, Alexandre J. da Silva, Isabel McAuliffe, Marcos de Almeida, Henry Bishop, Blaine Mathison, and Jeffrey L. Jones, Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria, Center for Global Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, E-mails: bqu5@cdc.gov, zqu6@CDC.GOV, pwilkins@cdc.gov, abs8@cdc.gov, ibm4@cdc.gov, bnz0@cdc.gov, hsb2@cdc.gov, gqa4@cdc.gov, and jlj1@cdc.gov. Ann Lindsay, Chris Hammond, and Ron Largusa, Public Health Branch, Humboldt County Department of Health, Eureka, CA, E-mails: ann.lindsay@stanford.edu, chris.hammond@stjoe.org, and RLargusa@co.humboldt.ca.us. Benjamin Sun, Center for Infectious Diseases, California Department of Public Health, Sacramento, CA, E-mail: bgs9@cdc.gov.

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