Severe Dengue Virus Infection in Pediatric Travelers Visiting Friends and Relatives after Travel to the Caribbean

Nivedita Krishnan Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Bronx Center for Travel and International Health, Bronx-Lebanon Hospital Center, Bronx, New York; Department of Pediatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York

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Murli Purswani Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Bronx Center for Travel and International Health, Bronx-Lebanon Hospital Center, Bronx, New York; Department of Pediatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York

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Stefan Hagmann Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Bronx Center for Travel and International Health, Bronx-Lebanon Hospital Center, Bronx, New York; Department of Pediatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York

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Of eight children given a diagnosis of dengue, a complicated course developed in three (38%), including one infant with dengue shock syndrome. Children visiting friends and relatives in dengue-endemic regions are at risk for severe dengue-associated morbidity. Children of families originally from these locations may benefit from pre-travel advice and may represent candidates for a future dengue vaccine.

Author Notes

*Address correspondence to Stefan Hagmann, Department of Pediatrics, Bronx Lebanon Hospital, 1650 Selwyn Avenue, Bronx, NY 10457. E-mail: shagmann@bronxleb.org

Authors' addresses: Nivedita Krishnan, Murli Purswani, and Stefan Hagmann, Department of Pediatrics, Bronx-Lebanon Hospital Center, Bronx, NY, E-mails: nkrishna@bronxleb.org, mpurswan@bronxleb.org, and shagmann@bronxleb.org.

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