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Interferon-Gamma Receptor-1 Gene Promoter Polymorphisms and Susceptibility to Leprosy in Children of a Single Family

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  • Pediatric Respiratory Diseases Research Centre, Tehran, Iran; Mycobacteriology Research Centre (MRC), National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (NRITLD),UNION and WHO Collaborating Centre, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences (Medical Campus), Tehran, Iran

The autosomal recessive disorder, because of a single mutation in interferon-γ receptor-1(IFNGR1) at position −56, was found to be associated with susceptibility to leprosy in children of the same family. The existence of such heterozygous carriers might explain the crucial role of IFNGR1 in the host defense against intracellular pathogens such as Mycobacterium leprae. The single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in major candidate genes, i.e., natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 (NRAMP1), vitamin D receptor (VDR), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-10 (IL-10), interleukin-12-receptor 1 (IL-12R1), were not found to be associated with this disease.

Author Notes

*Address correspondence to Parissa Farnia, Mycobacteriology Research Centre, NRITLD/UNION and WHO Collaborative Centre for TB and Lung Diseases, Shahid Beheshti University (Medical Campus), Tehran, 19556, P.O:19575/154, Iran. E-mail: pfarnia@hotmail.com

Financial support: This study was sponsored by a grant from MRC/NRITLD (010-18-007).

Authors' addresses: Ali A. Velayati, Soheila Khalilzadeh, and Maryam Hasanzadh, Pediatric Respiratory Diseases Research Centre, National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (NRITLD), Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences (Medical Campus), Tehran, Iran, E-mails: mycopf@hotmail.com, SKhalil@hotmail.com, and Hasanz2@yahoo.com. Parissa Farnia, Amir M. Farahbod, and Maryam F. Sheikolslam, Mycobacteriology Research Centre, NRITLD/UNION and WHO Collaborative Centre for TB and Lung Diseases, Shahid Beheshti University (Medical Campus), Tehran, Iran, E-mails: pfarnia@hotmail.com, amirmfar@yahoo.com, and m.sheikholslami@gmail.com.

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