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The Hygienic House: Mosquito-Proofing with Screens

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  • Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan
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Several years ago, members of ASTMH debated whether to remove the “H” word from the society's name. The stimulus for the debate was that modern, molecular biology and its ramifications for control of tropical infectious diseases lead away from such antiquated traditions as environmental hygiene toward a more sophisticated, biotechnological future. Ultimately, the membership decided to keep the “H.” In this issue of the Journal, Matthew Kirby and others of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (note: the “H” word comes first at the LSHTM) report on the social acceptability and durability of untreated screening to

Several years ago, members of ASTMH debated whether to remove the “H” word from the society's name. The stimulus for the debate was that modern, molecular biology and its ramifications for control of tropical infectious diseases lead away from such antiquated traditions as environmental hygiene toward a more sophisticated, biotechnological future. Ultimately, the membership decided to keep the “H.” In this issue of the Journal, Matthew Kirby and others of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (note: the “H” word comes first at the LSHTM) report on the social acceptability and durability of untreated screening to

Author Notes

*Address correspondence to Ned Walker, Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI. E-mail: walker@msu.edu
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