Giardia intestinalis Assemblages A and B Infections in Nepal

Anjana Singh Division of Infectious Diseases and International Health, Department of Medicine, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia; Central Department of Microbiology, Tribhuvan University, Kirtipur, Kathmandu, Nepal

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Lalitha Janaki Division of Infectious Diseases and International Health, Department of Medicine, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia; Central Department of Microbiology, Tribhuvan University, Kirtipur, Kathmandu, Nepal

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William A. Petri Jr Division of Infectious Diseases and International Health, Department of Medicine, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia; Central Department of Microbiology, Tribhuvan University, Kirtipur, Kathmandu, Nepal

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Eric R. Houpt Division of Infectious Diseases and International Health, Department of Medicine, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia; Central Department of Microbiology, Tribhuvan University, Kirtipur, Kathmandu, Nepal

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Giardia intestinalis is comprised of two major genotypes, A and B, which may vary in their propensity to cause disease. We tested for the presence of these two genotypes in stool samples from patients with gastrointestinal symptoms in Nepal. A total of 1,096 clinical specimens were screened by microscopy, and 45 samples with G. intestinalis were identified. Giardia infection was confirmed in 35 of 45 samples by a Giardia specific real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. Genotyping of the Giardia PCR product by restriction fragment length polymorphism indicated that 74% (26 of 35) were assemblage B, 20% (7 of 35) were assemblage A, and 6% (2 of 35) were mixed assemblages.

Author Notes

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    Hoge CW, Echeverria P, Rajah R, Jacobs J, Malthouse S, Chapman E, Jimenez LM, Shlim DR, 1995. Prevalence of Cyclospora species and other enteric pathogens among children less than 5 years of age in Nepal. J Clin Microbiol 33 :3058–3060.

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