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PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM TRANSMISSION BLOCKING IMMUNITY IN THREE AREAS WITH PERENNIAL OR SEASONAL ENDEMICITY AND DIFFERENT LEVELS OF TRANSMISSION

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  • 1 Unité de recherche 077, Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD), Dakar, Sénégal; International Center of Insect Physiology and Ecology, Nairobi, Kenya; Institut Pasteur, Unité d’immunologie moléculaire des parasites, Paris, France; Université Cheikh Anta Diop, Département de biologie animale, Dakar, Sénégal; Unité INSERM U 399 Faculté de médecine la Timone, Marseille, France

Plasmodium falciparum transmission blocking immunity (TBI) was investigated in 3 different endemic areas. Reared Anopheles gambiae s.s. were experimentally infected with the blood of gametocyte carriers, either in the presence of autologous plasma (OWN) or after replacement of the OWN plasma with a nonimmune serum of AB blood group (control). Transmission reduction was defined by a lower level of mosquito infection in the OWN batch compared with the control. After controlling for the effect of gametocytemia, the proportion of “transmission reducers” was lower in the town of Yaounde in Cameroon (UC), (14%, N = 75) than in the two rural areas of South Cameroon (RC) (29%, N = 31) and Sénégal (RS) (44%, N = 32). The contribution of TBI relative to the total inhibition of the parasite development (including human, parasite, and mosquito factors) was higher in RS (49.6%) than in RC (12.6%) and UC (9.5%).

Author Notes

Reprint requests: Christian Boudin. Laboratoire de paludologie, Centre I.R.D., BP 1386-CP18524, Dakar, Sénégal, Telephone: (221) 849 35 78, Fax: (221) 832 43 07, E-mail: boudin@ird.sn.
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