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SHORT REPORT: IDENTIFICATION OF ECHINOCOCCUS SPECIES FROM A YAK IN THE QINGHAI-TIBET PLATEAU REGION OF CHINA

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  • 1 Department of Parasitology and Animal Laboratory for Medical Research, Asahikawa Medical College, Asahikawa, Japan; Sichuan Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Chengdu, Sichuan, China; Division of Parasitic Diseases, National Centers for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia; Bioscience Research Institute, School of Environment and Life Sciences, University of Salford, Great Manchester, United Kingdom

The species identification of an echinococcal lesion in the liver of a yak in the Qinghai-Tibet plateau region of China, where both Echinococcus granulosus and E. multilocularis are present, was difficult to determine because of the atypical appearance of the lesion. Polymerase chain reaction–based mitochondrial genotyping allowed us to discriminate the Echinococcus species. Nucleotide sequences of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) and cytochrome b (cytb) genes amplified from the echinococcal lesion demonstrated that the yak was infected with the E. granulosus G1 genotype (sheep strain).

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