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NITAZOXANIDE: AN IMPORTANT ADVANCE IN ANTI-PARASITIC THERAPY

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  • 1 Infectious Diseases Section, Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas
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The field of anti-parasitic drugs has had a shaky history. The major pharmaceutical companies have increasingly focused their drug development efforts on the major markets, with potential annual sales of at least $100 million. This has not worked well for development of anti-parasitic drugs. Most patients develop parasitic infections due to poverty. Thus, while there may be millions of cases in developing countries, the number able to support the high prices of branded drugs is small. A few new drugs have come into the market. For example, mefloquine, albendazole, ivermectin, and atovaquone-proguanil have all come to the U.S. market since

The field of anti-parasitic drugs has had a shaky history. The major pharmaceutical companies have increasingly focused their drug development efforts on the major markets, with potential annual sales of at least $100 million. This has not worked well for development of anti-parasitic drugs. Most patients develop parasitic infections due to poverty. Thus, while there may be millions of cases in developing countries, the number able to support the high prices of branded drugs is small. A few new drugs have come into the market. For example, mefloquine, albendazole, ivermectin, and atovaquone-proguanil have all come to the U.S. market since

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