The Use of Erythrocyte Sensitizing Substance in the Diagnosis of Leptospiroses

II. The Sensitized Erythrocyte Lysis Test

R. Shihman ChangDepartment of Microbiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Laboratory of Microbiology and Pathology, Department of Health and Home Affairs, Boston, Massachusetts, Australia

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D. J. W. SmithDepartment of Microbiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Laboratory of Microbiology and Pathology, Department of Health and Home Affairs, Boston, Massachusetts, Australia

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Dorothy E. McCombDepartment of Microbiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Laboratory of Microbiology and Pathology, Department of Health and Home Affairs, Boston, Massachusetts, Australia

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C. F. SharpDepartment of Microbiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Laboratory of Microbiology and Pathology, Department of Health and Home Affairs, Boston, Massachusetts, Australia

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J. I. TongeDepartment of Microbiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Laboratory of Microbiology and Pathology, Department of Health and Home Affairs, Boston, Massachusetts, Australia

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Summary

The leptospiral sensitized erythrocyte lysis test established the diagnosis in all 40 cases of human leptospiroses. The sero-group specificity of the test was substantiated by the ability of L. pomona ESS to detect human infection caused by L. icterohemorrhagiae, L. canicola, L. pomona, L. hyos, L. australis A, L. australis B, “Robinson”, “Kremastos”, and “Celledoni”. The value of the SEL test in survey studies of past leptospiral infection requires further study.

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