Short Report: Extended Follow-up of the Natural History of Persons Infected with Leishmania chagasi

Thomas G. EvansInfectious Diseases Section, Salem Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Departments of Medicine and Pathology, Division of Geographic and International Medicine, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Nucleo de Medicina Tropical, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Salem, Virginia, Brazil

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Maria Jania TeixeiraInfectious Diseases Section, Salem Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Departments of Medicine and Pathology, Division of Geographic and International Medicine, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Nucleo de Medicina Tropical, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Salem, Virginia, Brazil

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Anastacio de Queiroz SousaInfectious Diseases Section, Salem Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Departments of Medicine and Pathology, Division of Geographic and International Medicine, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Nucleo de Medicina Tropical, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Salem, Virginia, Brazil

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Richard D. PearsonInfectious Diseases Section, Salem Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Departments of Medicine and Pathology, Division of Geographic and International Medicine, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Nucleo de Medicina Tropical, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Salem, Virginia, Brazil

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A five-year follow-up of the natural history of 924 children exposed to or infected with Leishmania chagasi was conducted in a rural area of northeast Brazil. Seventy-eight percent of the children sought were located. There was no evidence of smoldering disease or long subclinical latency in this population. The overall prevalence of clinical visceral leishmaniasis in this population was 6.1%, with a mortality rate of 10%.

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