Renal Pathology in Saimiri Monkeys during a Vaccine Trial Using the Recombinant Circumsporozoite Protein of Plasmodium Vivax

Tatsuya TegoshiInstitute of Pathology, Case Western Reserve University, Centers for Disease Control, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Cleveland, Ohio

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J. Roger BrodersonInstitute of Pathology, Case Western Reserve University, Centers for Disease Control, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Cleveland, Ohio

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Motohiro IsekiInstitute of Pathology, Case Western Reserve University, Centers for Disease Control, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Cleveland, Ohio

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Maung Maung OoInstitute of Pathology, Case Western Reserve University, Centers for Disease Control, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Cleveland, Ohio

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William E. CollinsInstitute of Pathology, Case Western Reserve University, Centers for Disease Control, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Cleveland, Ohio

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Masamichi AikawaInstitute of Pathology, Case Western Reserve University, Centers for Disease Control, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Cleveland, Ohio

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Renal specimens of squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus boliviensis) were studied by light microscopy and immunohistochemistry to examine the pathologic changes during vaccine trials with four recombinant circumsporozoite (CS) proteins (rPvCS-1, rPvCS-2, rPvCS-3, NSl81V20) of Plasmodium vivax. The monkeys were vaccinated and later challenged with P. vivax sporozoites. Among the 33 posttrial biopsies, 17 had mild to moderate mesangial proliferation and nine had interstitial nephritis. Immunohistochemistry by the peroxidase-antiperoxidase (PAP) method revealed IgG deposits in only three of 24 specimens and failed to demonstrate C3 deposits and P. vivax antigens in their glomeruli. There was no relationship between the severity of nephropathy and intensity of parasitemia. The intensity of parasitemia was the same in the vaccinated and control groups. Vaccinated monkeys from the groups (rPvCS-1, rPvCs-2, rPvCS-3) had no differences in renal pathology from the unvaccinated controls, but one group vaccinated with NSl81V20 did not develop renal changes.

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