Variations in Malaria Transmission Rates are not Related to Anopheline Survivorship per Feeding Cycle

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  • Papua New Guinea Institute of Medical Research, Queensland Institute of Medical Research, University of Queensland Medical School, Madang, Papua New Guinea

Anopheline survivorship, vectorial capacity, and mosquito infection probability estimates from mosquito infection rates were determined 4 times in 1 year in a Papua New Guinea village. Estimates of survivorship over the length of the extrinsic incubation period differed significantly during the year. However, survivorship per feeding cycle, individual mosquito vectorial capacity, and mosquito infection probability did not vary significantly. Estimates of these parameters were then compared to estimates of survivorship, individual vectorial capacity, and mosquito infection probability in mosquito populations in other villages in the study area. Since survivorship per feeding cycle did not vary significantly among the mosquito populations in these villages, changes in malaria transmission potential can be better gauged from estimates of survivorship over the length of the extrinsic incubation period. However, as measurements of relative inoculation rates are easier to perform and have been related to parasite prevalences in children in this area, estimates of inoculation rates are a preferred option for estimating malaria transmission in the Madang area of Papua New Guinea.

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