Renal Pathology in Owl Monkeys in Plasmodium falciparum Vaccine Trials

Motohiro IsekiInstitute of Pathology, Case Western Reserve University, Centers for Disease Control, Cleveland, Ohio, Georgia

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J. Roger BrodersonInstitute of Pathology, Case Western Reserve University, Centers for Disease Control, Cleveland, Ohio, Georgia

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Keith G. PirlInstitute of Pathology, Case Western Reserve University, Centers for Disease Control, Cleveland, Ohio, Georgia

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Ikuo IgarashiInstitute of Pathology, Case Western Reserve University, Centers for Disease Control, Cleveland, Ohio, Georgia

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William E. CollinsInstitute of Pathology, Case Western Reserve University, Centers for Disease Control, Cleveland, Ohio, Georgia

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Masamichi AikawaInstitute of Pathology, Case Western Reserve University, Centers for Disease Control, Cleveland, Ohio, Georgia

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Renal specimens of 16 owl monkeys (Aotus vociferans) were studied by light microscopy and immunohistochemistry during a vaccine trial with recombinant proteins of the ring-infected erythrocyte surface antigen (RESA) of Plasmodium falciparum. Deposition of IgG, C3, and P. falciparum antigens in the mesangium was demonstrated by the peroxidase anti-peroxidase (PAP) method. A relationship between the severity of parasitemia at the time of death and the presence of nephropathy was not apparent.

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