A Comparative Study of the Infection Thresholds of Thogoto Virus in Rhipicephalus appendiculatus and Amblyomma variegatum

Clive R. DaviesNERC, Institute of Virology and Environmental Microbiology, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Oxford, England

Search for other papers by Clive R. Davies in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Linda D. JonesNERC, Institute of Virology and Environmental Microbiology, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Oxford, England

Search for other papers by Linda D. Jones in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Patricia A. NuttallNERC, Institute of Virology and Environmental Microbiology, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Oxford, England

Search for other papers by Patricia A. Nuttall in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
Restricted access

Infection thresholds of Thogoto virus in 2 ixodid tick species, Rhipicephalus appendiculatus and Amblyomma variegatum, were compared. Thogoto virus has been isolated from naturally infected R. appendiculatus and A. variegatum in Central Africa, where both commonly parasitize the same hosts. No significant difference was found between the infection thresholds of Thogoto virus in the 2 species. The percentage of nymphs of both species infected by feeding on viremic hamsters was directly correlated with the time between host inoculation and tick engorgement. The blood titers in infected hamsters increased each day during the 3–4 day viremia until the hamsters died. The percentage of nymphs infected correlated with the viremic titer on the final day of engorgement (the time of maximum blood uptake). The 5% infection threshold for nymphs of R. appendiculatus and A. variegatum was estimated as 102.8 and 102.7 plaque forming units (PFU)/ml viremia, respectively. The prevalence of infection approached 100% for blood titers > 106.3 PFU/ml and > 107 PFU/ml, respectively. The apparent bloodmeal size of the 2 species differed by 8-fold and suggested that, in terms of the number of PFU ingested, R. appendiculatus was more susceptible than A. variegatum to per os infection by Thogoto virus.

Save