The Ecology of Colorado Tick Fever in Rocky Mountain National Park in 1974

III. Habitats Supporting the Virus

R. G. McLeanDivision of Vector-Borne Viral Diseases, Center for Infectious Disease, Centers for Disease Control, Public Health Service, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, P.O. Box 2087, Fort Collins, Colorado 80522

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R. B. ShrinerDivision of Vector-Borne Viral Diseases, Center for Infectious Disease, Centers for Disease Control, Public Health Service, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, P.O. Box 2087, Fort Collins, Colorado 80522

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K. S. PokornyDivision of Vector-Borne Viral Diseases, Center for Infectious Disease, Centers for Disease Control, Public Health Service, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, P.O. Box 2087, Fort Collins, Colorado 80522

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G. S. BowenDivision of Vector-Borne Viral Diseases, Center for Infectious Disease, Centers for Disease Control, Public Health Service, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, P.O. Box 2087, Fort Collins, Colorado 80522

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Ecologic studies of small mammals in Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP) were conducted in 1974 in order to identify the specific habitats within the Lower Montane Forest that support Colorado tick fever (CTF) virus. Data was collected on the abundance and distribution of 4 primary rodent species, tick infestation, CTF virus, and neutralizing antibody prevalence. Rodents were captured along transects crossing different habitats. Open stands of ponderosa pine and shrubs on dry, rocky surfaces were found to be important for maintaining CTF virus.

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