Carajas and Maraba Viruses, Two New Vesiculoviruses Isolated from Phlebotomine Sand Flies in Brazil

Amelia P. A. Travassos da RosaInstituto Evandro Chagas, Fundação Servicos de Saude Publica, Ministry of Health, C.P. 621, Belém, Pará 66,000, Brazil

Search for other papers by Amelia P. A. Travassos da Rosa in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Robert B. TeshYale Arbovirus Research Unit, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale Arbovirus Research Unit, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, P.O. Box 3333, New Haven, Connecticut 06510

Search for other papers by Robert B. Tesh in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Jorge F. Travassos da RosaInstituto Evandro Chagas, Fundação Servicos de Saude Publica, Ministry of Health, C.P. 621, Belém, Pará 66,000, Brazil

Search for other papers by Jorge F. Travassos da Rosa in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Jean Pierre HerveInstituto Evandro Chagas, Fundação Servicos de Saude Publica, Ministry of Health, C.P. 621, Belém, Pará 66,000, Brazil

Search for other papers by Jean Pierre Herve in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Andrew J. Main Jr.Yale Arbovirus Research Unit, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale Arbovirus Research Unit, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, P.O. Box 3333, New Haven, Connecticut 06510

Search for other papers by Andrew J. Main Jr. in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
Restricted access

Two new rhabdoviruses, designated Carajas and Maraba, are described. Both were isolated from phlebotomine sand flies (Lutzomyia spp.) collected in the Amazon basin of Brazil. One recovery of Carajas virus was made from male sand flies. By complement-fixation and neutralization tests both agents were shown to be members of the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) serogroup (genus Vesiculovirus). The pathogenicity of the two viruses in mice and Vero cells is similar to that of VSV-Indiana and VSV-New Jersey. Both Carajas and Maraba viruses replicated in Lutzomyia longipalpis following intrathoracic inoculation, and both agents were transovarially transmitted in this sand fly species.

Save