Prevalence and Intensity of Schistosoma Haematobium Infection in Six Villages of Upper Egypt

C. L. KingDepartment of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Department of Environmental and Industrial Health, The University of Michigan, The High Institute of Public Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, Egypt

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F. D. MillerDepartment of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Department of Environmental and Industrial Health, The University of Michigan, The High Institute of Public Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, Egypt

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M. HusseinDepartment of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Department of Environmental and Industrial Health, The University of Michigan, The High Institute of Public Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, Egypt

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R. BarkatDepartment of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Department of Environmental and Industrial Health, The University of Michigan, The High Institute of Public Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, Egypt

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A. S. MontoDepartment of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Department of Environmental and Industrial Health, The University of Michigan, The High Institute of Public Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, Egypt

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A cross-sectional survey for Schistosoma haematobium infection in 5,998 individuals, representing 31,803 persons in six rural villages of the Qena governorate, Upper Egypt, was completed. There were 2,223 persons (37.1%) excreting S. haematobium eggs identified by the nuclepore membrane filtration technique of a single urine specimen. Prevalence of infection ranged from 23.9% to 64.0% among the six villages. Quantitatively the overall geometric mean egg-count was 48.1 eggs/10 ml urine. A survey of proximal canals was conducted and 9 of 4,312 Bulinus snails were infected with schistosomes (0.21%). The stools of 2 of 507 adolescent males were positive for S. mansoni. No Biomphalaria snails were found. When these findings are compared to past studies, S. haematobium prevalence appears to have substantially increased.

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