Antibiotic Synergism in Amebiasis

Hamilton H. AndersonDepartment of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, and the Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of California, Sonoma State Hospital, San Francisco

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Thomas L. NelsonDepartment of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, and the Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of California, Sonoma State Hospital, San Francisco

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Arseny K. HrenoffDepartment of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, and the Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of California, Sonoma State Hospital, San Francisco

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Charles H. FishDepartment of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, and the Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of California, Sonoma State Hospital, San Francisco

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Summary

After suggestive studies in vitro and trials in 49 macaques, 52 episodes of amebic infection in mentally defective children were treated with erythromycin alone, with fumagillin alone, and with these antibiotics in combination. Two recurrences of 17 treated cases were noted after erythromycin therapy, 5 of 21 after the two antibiotics were given concurrently, and 6 of 14 after fumagillin was given alone. The final test regimes followed by the 13 human patients whose infection recurred, provided clearance for all but one of the original group of patients having E. histolytica infection.

Author Notes

With the technical assistance of Ruth M. McElroy, Jeanette Van D. Anderson and Dorothy Swanman. Supported, in part, by the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland and The Abbott Laboratories, North Chicago, Illinois (studies in man) and the Upjohn Laboratories, Kalamazoo, Michigan (studies in macaques).

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