Experimental Rabies in the Vampire Bat

Javier A. MorenoViral Zoonoses Branch, Virology Division, Bureau of Laboratories, Center for Disease Control, Public Health Service, U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (Lawrenceville Facility), P.O. Box 363, Lawrenceville, Georgia 30246

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George M. BaerViral Zoonoses Branch, Virology Division, Bureau of Laboratories, Center for Disease Control, Public Health Service, U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (Lawrenceville Facility), P.O. Box 363, Lawrenceville, Georgia 30246

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Vampire bats were inoculated intramuscularly and subcutaneously with varying doses of rabies virus to simulate bites by rabid animals in nature. Daily saliva samples were then taken from these animals to determine whether they excreted virus and for how long. Vampire bats appear to react to rabies virus as do other animals, with variable incubation periods, some excretion of virus in the saliva, but no prolonged excretion “carrier state.”

Author Notes

Present address: Fondo Nacional de Investigaciones Agropecuarias, Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Agropecuarias, Maracay, Edo. Aragua, Venezuela. (Study performed while on leave from this organization.)

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