Further Observations on Infections of Guinea Pigs with Venezuelan Encephalitis Virus Strains

W. F. SchererDepartment of Microbiology, Cornell University Medical College, Area of Biological Sciences, University of San Carlos Medical School, 1300 York Avenue, New York, New York 1002

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J. ChinDepartment of Microbiology, Cornell University Medical College, Area of Biological Sciences, University of San Carlos Medical School, 1300 York Avenue, New York, New York 1002

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J. V. OrdonezDepartment of Microbiology, Cornell University Medical College, Area of Biological Sciences, University of San Carlos Medical School, 1300 York Avenue, New York, New York 1002

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Guinea pigs from a Guatemalan colony died after subcutaneous inoculation of moderately small doses of equine-benign strains of Venezuelan encephalitis (VE) virus of hemagglutination-inhibition subtype I-E from enzootic habitats in Mexico and Guatemala. Thus these guinea pigs were unlike English short hair and inbred 13 guinea pigs, which usually survive infections with equine-benign VE strains of subtype I-E. We therefore caution others that not all strains of guinea pigs can be used to evaluate the potential equine virulence of VE viruses.

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