Liver Changes in Hamsters Infected with a Liver Fluke of Man, Opisthorchis Viverrini

Natth BhamarapravatiDepartment of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Department of Pathobiology, Faculty of Science, and Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University, Rama VI Road, Bangkok 4, Thailand

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Witaya ThammavitDepartment of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Department of Pathobiology, Faculty of Science, and Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University, Rama VI Road, Bangkok 4, Thailand

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Suvajra VajrasthiraDepartment of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Department of Pathobiology, Faculty of Science, and Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University, Rama VI Road, Bangkok 4, Thailand

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Thirty male Syrian golden hamsters were each infected with 100 metacercariae of Opisthorchis viverrini. The hamsters were killed at 3, 7, 15, 30, 45, and 154 days of infection. The early pathological changes consisted of an acute inflammatory reaction involving the bile ducts of the second order and the portal connective tissue, especially the large veins, as well as focal coagulation necrosis of the liver lobules. As the flukes developed into adults they induced hyperplasia and adenomatous formations of the bile duct epithelium. There was also a granulomatous response to the adult flukes and eggs. Resolution of the granulomas led to periductal and portal scarring. These findings suggest that immunopathologic mechanisms may be important in the pathogenesis of liver fluke disease.

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