Trichinosis Acquired at Sea—Report of an Outbreak

Mitchell SingalInjectious Disease Section, California State Department of Health, Parasitic Diseases Branch, Parasitic Diseases and Veterinary Public Health Division, Bureau of Epidemiology, Center for Disease Control, Berkeley, California 94704

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Peter M. SchantzInjectious Disease Section, California State Department of Health, Parasitic Diseases Branch, Parasitic Diseases and Veterinary Public Health Division, Bureau of Epidemiology, Center for Disease Control, Berkeley, California 94704

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S. Benson WernerInjectious Disease Section, California State Department of Health, Parasitic Diseases Branch, Parasitic Diseases and Veterinary Public Health Division, Bureau of Epidemiology, Center for Disease Control, Berkeley, California 94704

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In 1974, at least 13 persons acquired trichinosis aboard a luxury liner en route to Alaska. Epidemiologic investigation implicated ground beef served on the ship as the vehicle of transmission. The beef is thought to have been contaminated by pork which had previously been frozen, though presumably not under trichinacidal conditions. To our knowledge, this is the first report of trichinosis acquired at sea.

Author Notes

Currently: Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer, Center for Disease Control, assigned to the Bureau for Health Services, Kentucky Department for Human Resources, Frankfort.

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